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dc.contributor.authorSukhina, Alona
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-09T23:06:23Z
dc.date.available2018-04-09T23:06:23Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/627265
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children can result in cognitive, emotional and somatic neurological impairments. In adults, post-traumatic hypopituitarism can extend or exacerbate these impairments, likely due to mechanical damage to the pituitary and hypothalamus. The pituitary in the pediatric brain likely suffers similar mechanical damage, inducing endocrinopathies as in adults, but injury-induced endocrinopathies are infrequently reported in children. Unrecognized hypopituitarism may lead to elevated risks of metabolic syndrome, diabetes, delayed or absent puberty, short stature, and other endocrinopathies. However, screening for endocrine deficiencies in susceptible patients and initiating appropriate hormone replacement therapy may prevent these sequelae and improve the prospects for recovery. Results: We determined that TBI victims were 3.18-times higher risk of developing a central endocrinopathy compared with the general population (CI=0.264), pediatric AHCCCS patients with a central endocrinopathy had a 3.2-fold higher odds of a history with TBI than those without a central endocrinopathy (CI=0.266), of the central endocrinopathy in TBI victims is attributable to the TBI, and the number of patients who need to be exposed to a TBI for 1 patient to develop an endocrinopathy was 154.2 (CI=7.11). We also determined that more males than females presented with central endocrinopathies after TBI compared with the general population of TBI victims.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjecttraumatic brain injuriesen
dc.subjectchildrenen
dc.subjectAdolescentsen
dc.subjectTeenagersen
dc.subjectFemale Adolescenten
dc.subjectMale Adolescenten
dc.subjectEndocrine Diseasesen
dc.subjectgrowth hormone deficiencyen
dc.subjectPituitary Insufficiencyen
dc.subjectendocrine dysfunctionen
dc.subject.meshHypopituitarismen
dc.subject.meshBrain Injuries, Traumaticen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshEndocrine System Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshEpidemiologyen
dc.titleEpidemiology of Post-Traumatic Brain Injury-Induced Hypothalamic Pituitary Dysfunction in Arizona AHCCCS Patientsen_US
dc.typetext; Electronic Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2018 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorLifshitz, Jonathanen
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-09T23:06:23Z


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