Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorVerrier, James T.*
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-12T23:44:15Z
dc.date.available2018-04-12T23:44:15Z
dc.date.issued2017-10
dc.identifier.issn0734-3434
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/627275
dc.description.abstractDetailed habitat information for the holomycotrophic orchids, Corallorhiza maculata, C. striata, and C. wisteriana, was recorded from multiple sites in the Santa Catalina Mountains, southeastern Arizona. This study was initiated to see if there are predictable associations with host trees. Over 1,400 flowering stems were observed from 244 microsites at 10 localities across a 305 m elevational gradient, and within an area of 7 km2 (700 hectares). While C. maculata showed a preference for southwestern white pine (Pinus strobiformis), C. striata associated with white fir (Abies concolor) and bigtooth maple (Acer grandidentatum). White fir and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menzesii var. glauca) were the preferred associates of C. wisteriana. Orchids were found at microsites along lower slopes at up to 45% inclinations and generally 3-24 m above the slope base. Nearly all sites were north facing with moderate to thick leaf litter. A third of all microsites had no forbs or graminoids associated with orchid clusters, confirming the obligate association with primarily conifers. The local distribution showed a pattern of niche partitioning, with the three species occurring in similar habitats but depending on different host trees. Although C. striata and C. wisteriana associated mainly with white fir, C. striata favored habitat with more nutrient-rich soils.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.
dc.sourceDesert Plants Editorial Staff.
dc.titleHabitat Preference of Three Parasitic Orchids Occurring Sympatrically in an Arizona Sky Islanden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Plant Scien_US
dc.identifier.journalDesert Plantsen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationDesert Plants is published by The University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum. For more information about this unique botanical journal, please email the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications Office at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-12T23:44:16Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
dp_33_01_10-18.pdf
Size:
1.753Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Article

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record