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dc.contributor.authorEhiri, John*
dc.contributor.authorAlaofè, Halimatou*
dc.contributor.authorAsaolu, Ibitola*
dc.contributor.authorChebet, Joy*
dc.contributor.authorEsu, Ekpereonne*
dc.contributor.authorMeremikwu, Martin*
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-03T22:47:19Z
dc.date.available2018-05-03T22:47:19Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-25
dc.identifier.citationEhiri et al. Systematic Reviews (2018) 7:65 https://doi.org/10.1186/s13643-018-0729-2en_US
dc.identifier.issn2046-4053
dc.identifier.pmid29695299
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13643-018-0729-2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/627572
dc.description.abstractTransportation interventions seek to decrease delay in reaching a health facility for emergency obstetric care and are, thus, believed to contribute to reductions in such adverse pregnancy and childbirth outcomes as maternal deaths, stillbirths, and neonatal mortality in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). However, there is limited empirical evidence to support this hypothesis. The objective of the proposed review is to summarize and critically appraise evidence regarding the effect of emergency transportation interventions on outcomes of labor and delivery in LMICs. The following databases will be searched from inception to March 31, 2018: MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, EBSCO (PsycINFO and CINAHL), the Cochrane Pregnancy and Child Birth Group's Specialized Register, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. We will search for studies in the grey literature through Google and Google Scholar. We will solicit unpublished reports from such relevant agencies as United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA), the World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), and the United Kingdom Department for International Development (DfID) among others. Data generated from the search will be managed using Endnote Version 7. We will perform quantitative data synthesis if studies are homogenous in characteristics and provide adequate outcome data for meta-analysis. Otherwise, data will be synthesized, using the narrative synthesis approach. Among the many barriers that women in LMICs face in accessing life-saving interventions during labor and delivery, lack of access to emergency transportation is particularly important. This review will provide a critical summary of evidence regarding the impact of transportation interventions on outcomes of pregnancy and childbirth in LMICs. PROSPERO CRD42017080092.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_US
dc.rights© The Author(s). 2018 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.en_US
dc.subjectMaternal, child, and newborn healthen_US
dc.subjectObstetric complicationsen_US
dc.subjectEmergency obstetric transportationen_US
dc.subjectThree-delay frameworken_US
dc.subjectLow- and middle-income countriesen_US
dc.subjectMaternal healthen_US
dc.subjectNewborn healthen_US
dc.subjectChild healthen_US
dc.subjectGlobal maternal and child healthen_US
dc.titleEmergency transportation interventions for reducing adverse pregnancy outcomes in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review protocolen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Health Promotion Sciences, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalSystematic Reviewsen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access journal.en_US
dc.description.noteUA Open Access Publishing Fund.
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleSystematic reviews
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-03T22:47:20Z


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