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dc.contributor.authorSexstone, Graham A.
dc.contributor.authorClow, David W.
dc.contributor.authorFassnacht, Steven R.
dc.contributor.authorListon, Glen E.
dc.contributor.authorHiemstra, Christopher A.
dc.contributor.authorKnowles, John F.
dc.contributor.authorPenn, Colin A.
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-14T19:13:23Z
dc.date.available2018-05-14T19:13:23Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-06
dc.identifier.citationSexstone, G. A., Clow, D. W., Fassnacht, S. R., Liston, G. E., Hiemstra, C. A., Knowles, J. F., & Penn, C. A. (2018). Snow sublimation in mountain environments and its sensitivity to forest disturbance and climate warming. Water Resources Research, 54, 1191–1211. https://doi.org/10.1002/2017WR021172en_US
dc.identifier.issn0043-1397
dc.identifier.issn1944-7973
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2017WR021172
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/627607
dc.description.abstractSnow sublimation is an important component of the snow mass balance, but the spatial and temporal variability of this process is not well understood in mountain environments. This study combines a process-based snow model (SnowModel) with eddy covariance (EC) measurements to investigate (1) the spatio-temporal variability of simulated snow sublimation with respect to station observations, (2) the contribution of snow sublimation to the ablation of the snowpack, and (3) the sensitivity and response of snow sublimation to bark beetle-induced forest mortality and climate warming across the north-central Colorado Rocky Mountains. EC-based observations of snow sublimation compared well with simulated snow sublimation at stations dominated by surface and canopy sublimation, but blowing snow sublimation in alpine areas was not well captured by the EC instrumentation. Water balance calculations provided an important validation of simulated sublimation at the watershed scale. Simulated snow sublimation across the study area was equivalent to 28% of winter precipitation on average, and the highest relative snow sublimation fluxes occurred during the lowest snow years. Snow sublimation from forested areas accounted for the majority of sublimation fluxes, highlighting the importance of canopy and sub-canopy surface sublimation in this region. Simulations incorporating the effects of tree mortality due to bark-beetle disturbance resulted in a 4% reduction in snow sublimation from forested areas. Snow sublimation rates corresponding to climate warming simulations remained unchanged or slightly increased, but total sublimation losses decreased by up to 6% because of a reduction in snow covered area and duration.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUSGS Water Availability and Use Science Program; USGS Climate and Land Use Change Program; NSF [DEB 1027341]en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAMER GEOPHYSICAL UNIONen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/2017WR021172en_US
dc.rights© 2018. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectsublimationen_US
dc.subjectSnowModelen_US
dc.subjecteddy covarianceen_US
dc.subjectColorado Rocky Mountainsen_US
dc.subjectbark beetlesen_US
dc.subjectclimate warmingen_US
dc.titleSnow Sublimation in Mountain Environments and Its Sensitivity to Forest Disturbance and Climate Warmingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Geog & Deven_US
dc.identifier.journalWATER RESOURCES RESEARCHen_US
dc.description.note6 month embargo; published online: 06 February 2018en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US


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