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dc.contributor.authorRen, Bin*
dc.contributor.authorDong, Ruobing*
dc.contributor.authorEsposito, Thomas M.*
dc.contributor.authorPueyo, Laurent*
dc.contributor.authorDebes, John H.*
dc.contributor.authorPoteet, Charles A.*
dc.contributor.authorChoquet, Élodie*
dc.contributor.authorBenisty, Myriam*
dc.contributor.authorChiang, Eugene*
dc.contributor.authorGrady, Carol A.*
dc.contributor.authorHines, Dean C.*
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, Glenn*
dc.contributor.authorSoummer, Rémi*
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-15T22:18:11Z
dc.date.available2018-05-15T22:18:11Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-10
dc.identifier.citationRen, B., Dong, R., Esposito, T. M., Pueyo, L., Debes, J. H., Poteet, C. A., . . . Soummer, R. (2018). A Decade of MWC 758 Disk Images: Where Are the Spiral-arm-driving Planets? The Astrophysical Journal, 857(1). doi:10.3847/2041-8213/aab7f5en_US
dc.identifier.issn2041-8213
dc.identifier.issn2041-8205
dc.identifier.doi10.3847/2041-8213/aab7f5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/627620
dc.description.abstractLarge-scale spiral arms have been revealed in scattered light images of a few protoplanetary disks. Theoretical models suggest that such arms may be driven by and corotate with giant planets, which has called for remarkable observational efforts to look for them. By examining the rotation of the spiral arms for the MWC 758 system over a 10 year timescale, we are able to provide dynamical constraints on the locations of their perturbers. We present reprocessed Hubble Space Telescope (HST )/NICMOS F110W observations of the target in 2005, and the new Keck/NIRC2 L′-band observations in 2017. MWC 758ʼs two well-known spiral arms are revealed in the NICMOS archive at the earliest observational epoch. With additional Very Large Telescope (VLT )/SPHERE data, our joint analysis leads to a pattern speed of 0.6 degrees(+3.3 degrees)(-0.6 degrees) yr(-1) at 3σ for the two major spiral arms. If the two arms are induced by a perturber on a near-circular orbit, its best-fit orbit is at 89 au (0 59), with a 3σ lower limit of 30 au (0 20). This finding is consistent with the simulation prediction of the location of an arm-driving planet for the two major arms in the system.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipState of Maryland grant; NASA through Hubble Fellowship by STScI [ST-HF2-51355]; AURA, Inc. [NAS5-26555]; NASA [HST-AR-12652, NNX15AD95G/NEXSS, NNX15AC89G, HST-GO-11136, HST-GO-13855, HST-GO-13331]; NSF [AST-1518332]; STScI Director's Discretionary Research funds; AURA under NASA [NAS5-26555]; NASA's Science Mission Directorateen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherIOP PUBLISHING LTDen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://stacks.iop.org/2041-8205/857/i=1/a=L9?key=crossref.6a43045a3c4c3b47a40dc1f9511415d3en_US
dc.rights© 2018. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserveden_US
dc.subjectprotoplanetary disksen_US
dc.subjectstars: imagingen_US
dc.subjectstars: individual (MWC 758)en_US
dc.titleA Decade of MWC 758 Disk Images: Where Are the Spiral-arm-driving Planets?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Steward Observ, Tucson, AZ 85719 USAen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Steward Observ, Tucson, AZ 85721 USAen_US
dc.identifier.journalASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL LETTERSen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleThe Astrophysical Journal
dc.source.volume857
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpageL9
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-15T22:18:12Z


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