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dc.contributor.authorPezer, Željka
dc.contributor.authorChung, Amanda G.
dc.contributor.authorKarn, Robert C.
dc.contributor.authorLaukaitis, Christina M.
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-15T22:50:46Z
dc.date.available2018-05-15T22:50:46Z
dc.date.issued2017-06
dc.identifier.citationPezer, Željka, et al. “Analysis of Copy Number Variation in the Abp Gene Regions of Two House Mouse Subspecies Suggests Divergence during the Gene Family Expansions.” Genome Biology and Evolution, vol. 9, no. 6, 2017, doi:10.1093/gbe/evx099.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1759-6653
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/gbe/evx099
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/627622
dc.description.abstractThe Androgen-binding protein (Abp) gene region of the mouse genome contains 64 genes, some encoding pheromones that influence assortative mating between mice from different subspecies. Using CNVnator and quantitative PCR, we explored copy number variation in this gene family in natural populations of Musmusculus domesticus (Mmd) and Musmusculus musculus (Mmm), two subspecies of house mice that form a narrow hybrid zone in Central Europe. We found that copy number variation in the center of the Abp gene region is very common in wild Mmd, primarily representing the presence/absence of the final duplications described for the mouse genome. Clustering of Mmd individuals based on this variation did not reflect their geographical origin, suggesting no population divergence in the Abp gene cluster. However, copy number variation patterns differ substantially between Mmd and other mouse taxa. Large blocks of Abp genes are absent in Mmm, Musmusculus castaneus and an outgroup, Mus spretus, although with differences in variation and breakpoint locations. Our analysis calls into question the reliance on a reference genome for interpreting the detailed organization of genes in taxa more distant from the Mmd reference genome. The polymorphic nature of the gene family expansion in all four taxa suggests that the number of Abp genes, especially in the central gene region, is not critical to the survival and reproduction of the mouse. However, Abp haplotypes of variable length may serve as a source of raw genetic material for new signals influencing reproductive communication and thus speciation of mice.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health [U54 CA143924, P30 CA023074]en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherOXFORD UNIV PRESSen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://academic.oup.com/gbe/article/doi/10.1093/gbe/evx099/3858091en_US
dc.rights© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subjectandrogen-binding proteinen_US
dc.subjectcopy number variationen_US
dc.subjectgene family expansionen_US
dc.subjectdivergenceen_US
dc.subjecthybrid zoneen_US
dc.subjectMus musculus subspeciesen_US
dc.titleAnalysis of Copy Number Variation in the Abp Gene Regions of Two House Mouse Subspecies Suggests Divergence during the Gene Family Expansionsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Med, Dept Med, Tucson, AZ 85721 USAen_US
dc.identifier.journalGENOME BIOLOGY AND EVOLUTIONen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access journal.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleGenome Biology and Evolution
dc.source.volume9
dc.source.issue6
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-15T22:50:46Z


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© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License.