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dc.contributor.advisorRomanowski, Marek
dc.contributor.authorKnights-Mitchell, Shellie
dc.creatorKnights-Mitchell, Shellie
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-21T19:40:21Z
dc.date.available2018-05-21T19:40:21Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/627719
dc.description.abstractFor many types of cancers chemotherapy is the treatment of choice despite evidence that this treatment modality is contributing only about 2 % to the 5-year survival in all types of cancers. One of the main disadvantages of the use of chemotherapy is that it is administered throughout the entire body, which accounts for the associated side effects of cancer treatment. Drug delivery systems (DDS) are a safe and reliable method of getting drugs to a disease site. They can effectively protect the healthy areas of the body from the adverse effects of the drug while also preventing the degradation of the drug, due to enzymatic action, within the body. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved DDSs, such as Doxil, a liposomal formulation of doxorubicin, have been introduced to clinical practice to limit systemic exposure to such drugs and thereby reduce related toxicities. However, one of the main challenges that this, and many other drug delivery systems face, is the ability to successfully release content on demand at the target site. The work contained within is focused on the optimization of a liposomal drug delivery system. This was done by harnessing both the plasmon resonant capabilities of gold nanoparticles as well as the ability to use ligands as a mechanism to target specific cancers. We introduced liposome-supported plasmon resonant gold nanoshells, a DDS that works on the premise of the conversion of light energy to heat that in turn initiates drug leakage from the liposome core. This dissertation is focused on building upon this observed phenomenon to address the need for a drug delivery system that is targeted specifically to diseased sites and is also capable of releasing content on demand.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectDoxorubicinen_US
dc.subjectDrug Deliveryen_US
dc.subjectLiposomesen_US
dc.subjectPlasmon Resonanceen_US
dc.titlePlasmon Resonant Liposomes as a Targeted, Controlled-Release Drug Delivery Systemen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMatsunaga, Terry
dc.contributor.committeememberStratton, Steven
dc.contributor.committeememberUtzinger, Urs
dc.contributor.committeememberWoodhead, Gregory J.
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiomedical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-21T19:40:21Z


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