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dc.contributor.advisorMarrone, Nicole
dc.contributor.authorShehorn, James
dc.creatorShehorn, James
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-21T19:41:52Z
dc.date.available2018-05-21T19:41:52Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/627725
dc.description.abstractDifficulty perceiving speech in noise is a common complaint for individuals with hearing loss, even while wearing hearing aids. Current clinical test measures are limited in their ability to predict potential benefit from hearing aid interventions such as directionality. If speech in noise interventions provide an SNR boost, then the slope of a speech in noise psychometric function or rate of improvement could help to predict the corresponding intelligibility benefit due to an improved SNR. Recent research highlights the association between cognition, hearing loss, and speech perception in noise. We hypothesized that the rate of improvement, which is likely associated with both auditory and cognitive factors, may be a source of the variable benefit observed from directionality. Our study revealed that more intelligibility benefit due to hearing aid directionality was measured in a listening condition which resulted in steeper rate of improvement (babble background) than a listening condition which resulted in a shallower rate of improvement (competing speech). Additionally, the rates of improvement between our most relevant SNRs were significantly associated with directional benefit. These results confirm that the rate of improvement for a given range of SNRs could help in predicting potential benefit from an SNR intervention within a hearing loss population. Our results confirmed that hearing loss severity of negatively associated with rate of improvement and working memory capacity was positively associated with rate of improvement. Our findings support the involvement of cognition in addition to the auditory pathway for the perception of degraded speech signals within a population with hearing loss. Measuring cognitive factors such as working memory capacity could improve our understanding of patient variability for aided speech in noise outcomes and provide a patient-specific approach to hearing loss interventions.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectAdultsen_US
dc.subjectCognitionen_US
dc.subjectDirectionalityen_US
dc.subjectHearing Lossen_US
dc.subjectSlope of Psychometric Functionen_US
dc.subjectSpeech Perception in Noiseen_US
dc.titlePredicting Benefit from a Signal-to-Noise Ratio Hearing Aid Intervention Based on Individual Differences in Hearing and Cognition within an Older Adult Populationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAlt, Mary
dc.contributor.committeememberCone, Barbara
dc.contributor.committeememberGlisky, Elizabeth
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech, Language, & Hearing Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-21T19:41:52Z


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