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dc.contributor.advisorKarant-Nunn, Susan C.
dc.contributor.advisorLotz-Heumann, Ute
dc.contributor.authorNeufeld, David Yoder
dc.creatorNeufeld, David Yoder
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-23T23:41:20Z
dc.date.available2018-05-23T23:41:20Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/627773
dc.description.abstractFor more than a century after the genesis of an Anabaptist movement in Zurich in 1525, participants in this prohibited religious culture continued to live in rural lands under the city- republic’s control. This dissertation examines the character of the coexistence of members of the Anabaptist minority and representatives of the Reformed majority in this territory between 1585, when the city council promulgated a new set of anti-Anabaptist mandates, and c. 1650, when official coercion eliminated the presence of nonconformist communities from the area. Drawing on a diverse body of archival evidence, the author concludes that Anabaptist-Reformed coexistence during this period occurred under conditions of repression. This phrase describes relations between a subordinate but active minority and a dominant majority when the latter both desired and took concrete steps to eliminate religious diversity as a notable feature of public life. Under such conditions, manifestations of Anabaptist religious culture—illicit mobility, recounting of conversion experiences, selective withdrawal from parish life, and courtship and marriage practices—often triggered a repressive response. These actions, by rendering nonconformity visible, violated cultural norms and boundaries that representatives of the Reformed majority considered worthy of defense. While levels of Anabaptist activity remained relatively stable, the severity of conflict between these groups vacillated markedly, influenced by varying configurations of governmental power, understandings of communal space, solidarities of kinship and neighborliness, and practices of record-production and record-keeping. Although repression pushed Anabaptists into marginal spaces, it did not provoke widespread dissimulation. Rather, dissidents generally remained willing, if not eager, to incur costs for the articulation of religious difference. The fact and nature of long-term Anabaptist-Reformed coexistence in Zurich’s lands expands appreciation of the breadth of possibilities for religious diversity in early modern Europe. At the same time, it shows how tenuous and cruel coexistence could be when stamped by conflict, domination, and human suffering.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectAnabaptismen_US
dc.subjectCoexistenceen_US
dc.subjectReformationen_US
dc.subjectSeventeenth Centuryen_US
dc.subjectSwitzerlanden_US
dc.subjectZurichen_US
dc.titleMarginal Coexistence: Anabaptists between Persecution and Toleration in Reformed Zurich, 1585-1650en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMilliman, Paul
dc.contributor.committeememberPlummer, Marjorie E.
dc.description.releaseDissertation not available (per author's request)en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-23T23:41:20Z


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