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dc.contributor.authorGebhardt, Martha
dc.contributor.authorFehmi, Jeffrey S.
dc.contributor.authorRasmussen, Craig
dc.contributor.authorGallery, Rachel E.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-12T18:55:06Z
dc.date.available2018-06-12T18:55:06Z
dc.date.issued2017-10
dc.identifier.citationGebhardt, M., Fehmi, J.S., Rasmussen, C. et al. Plant Soil (2017) 419: 53. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11104-017-3327-5en_US
dc.identifier.issn0032-079X
dc.identifier.issn1573-5036
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11104-017-3327-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/627939
dc.description.abstractWe tested the effects of soil biotic disturbance and biochar or woodchip amendments on plant growth, soil microbial biomass and activity, and soil physiochemical parameters in response to disturbance in a semi-desert grassland. In a 78-day growth chamber experiment using six grass species native to the Southwest U.S., we compared the effects of autoclave heatshock, which mimics soil stockpiling in hot drylands, and amendments on plant and microbial biomass, potential extracellular enzyme activity, and soil moisture and nutrient availability. Plant biomass was lowest in woodchip-amended soils, and highest in autoclaved and biochar-amended soils (p < 0.05). Root:shoot ratios were higher in the autoclaved and woodchip-amended soils (p < 0.05). Biochar addition improved soil water-holding capacity resulting in higher dissolved organic carbon (p < 0.001) and nitrogen (p < 0.001). Soil microbial activity and plant biomass were not correlated. Amendment-induced changes in activity could be partially explained by nutrient availability. Neither microbial biomass nor activity recovered to pre-disturbance values. In this study, biochar and woodchip amendment and autoclave-induced changes to moisture and nutrient availability influenced plant biomass allocation and soil microbial activity. Amendments increased carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus mineralizing enzyme activities with no significant change in microbial biomass, indicating that soil recovery in drylands is a long-term process. Understanding plant-soil feedbacks in drylands is critically important to mitigating climate and anthropogenic-driven changes and retaining or reestablishing native plant communities.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipRosemont Copper Company; University of Arizona Agricultural Experiment Station; National Institute of Food and Agriculture [NIFA ARZT-1360540-H12-199]en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSPRINGERen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11104-017-3327-5en_US
dc.rights© Springer International Publishing AG 2017en_US
dc.subjectAutoclave heat-shocken_US
dc.subjectBiocharen_US
dc.subjectDrylandsen_US
dc.subjectExtracellular enzyme activityen_US
dc.subjectPlant-soil feedbacksen_US
dc.subjectWoodchipsen_US
dc.titleSoil amendments alter plant biomass and soil microbial activity in a semi-desert grasslanden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Nat Resources & Environm Environm & Nat Resouen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Soil Water & Environm Scien_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biolen_US
dc.identifier.journalPLANT AND SOILen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; published online: 05 July 2017en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.journaltitlePlant and Soil
dc.source.volume419
dc.source.issue1-2
dc.source.beginpage53
dc.source.endpage70


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