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dc.contributor.authorMartin, Jeff M.
dc.contributor.authorMead, Jim I.
dc.contributor.authorBarboza, Perry S.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-12T22:54:07Z
dc.date.available2018-06-12T22:54:07Z
dc.date.issued2018-05
dc.identifier.citationMartin JM, Mead JI, Barboza PS. Bison body size and climate change. Ecol Evol. 2018;8:4564–4574. https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.4019en_US
dc.identifier.issn2045-7758
dc.identifier.pmid29760897
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ece3.4019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/627952
dc.description.abstractThe relationship between body size and temperature of mammals is poorly resolved, especially for large keystone species such as bison (Bison bison). Bison are well represented in the fossil record across North America, which provides an opportunity to relate body size to climate within a species. We measured the length of a leg bone (calcaneal tuber, DstL) in 849 specimens from 60 localities that were dated by stratigraphy and C-14 decay. We estimated body mass (M) as M=(DstL/11.49)(3). Average annual temperature was estimated from O-18 values in the ice cores from Greenland. Calcaneal tuber length of Bison declined over the last 40.000 years, that is, average body mass was 37% larger (910 +/- 50kg) than today (665 +/- 21kg). Average annual temperature has warmed by 6 degrees C since the Last Glacial Maximum (similar to 24-18 kya) and is predicted to further increase by 4 degrees C by the end of the 21st century. If body size continues to linearly respond to global temperature, Bison body mass will likely decline by an additional 46%, to 357 +/- 54kg, with an increase of 4 degrees C globally. The rate of mass loss is 41 +/- 10kg per degrees C increase in global temperature. Changes in body size of Bison may be a result of migration, disease, or human harvest but those effects are likely to be local and short-term and not likely to persist over the long time scale of the fossil record. The strong correspondence between body size of bison and air temperature is more likely the result of persistent effects on the ability to grow and the consequences of sustaining a large body mass in a warming environment. Continuing rises in global temperature will likely depress body sizes of bison, and perhaps other large grazers, without human intervention.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDivision of Graduate Education [1144423]; Western Bison Association; Throlson American Bison Foundation; Larry D. Agenbroad Legacy Fund; US National Science Foundationen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWILEYen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/ece3.4019en_US
dc.rights© 2018 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectBergmann's ruleen_US
dc.subjectbody size changeen_US
dc.subjectclimate changeen_US
dc.subjectfossilen_US
dc.subjectNorth Americaen_US
dc.subjectungulateen_US
dc.titleBison body size and climate changeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Desert Lab Tumamoc Hillen_US
dc.identifier.journalECOLOGY AND EVOLUTIONen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access journal.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-12T22:54:08Z


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© 2018 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.