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dc.contributor.authorMunguia-Vega, Adrian
dc.contributor.authorMarinone, S. Guido
dc.contributor.authorPaz-Garcia, David A.
dc.contributor.authorGiron-Nava, Alfredo
dc.contributor.authorPlomozo-Lugo, Tomas
dc.contributor.authorGonzalez-Cuellar, Ollin
dc.contributor.authorWeaver, Amy Hudson
dc.contributor.authorGarcía-Rodriguez, Francisco J.
dc.contributor.authorReyes-Bonilla, Hector
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-16T18:33:53Z
dc.date.available2018-07-16T18:33:53Z
dc.date.issued2018-01
dc.identifier.citationMunguia-Vega, A., Marinone, S.G., Paz-Garcia, D.A. et al. Mar Biol (2018) 165: 16. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00227-017-3267-xen_US
dc.identifier.issn0025-3162
dc.identifier.issn1432-1793
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00227-017-3267-x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/628230
dc.description.abstractThe dispersal during the planktonic larval period is a key feature to understand the metapopulation structure of marine fishes, and is commonly described by four general models: (1) lack of population structure due to extensive larval dispersal; (2) isolation by geographic distance, where larval connectivity decreases with increasing distance between sites in all directions (isotropy); (3) population structure without any clear geographic trend (chaotic); and (4) population structure explained by seascape approaches that explicitly incorporate the spatial and temporal variations in the direction and strength of oceanic currents via oceanographic modeling. We tested the four models in the Pacific red snapper Lutjanus peru, a key commercial species in the Gulf of California (GC), Mexico. We genotyped 15 microsatellite loci in 225 samples collected during 20152016 from 8 sites, and contrasted the observed empirical genetic patterns against predictions from each model. We found low but significant levels of population structure among sites. Only the seascape approach was able to significantly explain levels of genetic structure and diversity, but exclusively within spring and summer, suggesting that this period represents the spawning season for L. peru. We showed that in the GC, the strong asymmetry in the oceanic currents causes larval connectivity to show different values when measured in distinct directions (anisotropy). Management tools, including marine reserves, could be more effective if placed upstream of the predominant flow. Managers should consider that oceanographic distances describing the direction and intensity of currents during the spawning period are significant predictors of larval connectivity between sites, as opposed to geographic distances.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCONACYT fellowship [250126]; Walton Family Foundation [2011-1235]; David and Lucile Packard Foundation [2013-39359, 2013-39400, 2015-62798]; Fondo Institucional CONACYT-Fronteras de la Ciencia [26/2016]en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSPRINGER HEIDELBERGen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00227-017-3267-xen_US
dc.rights© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2017.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.titleAnisotropic larval connectivity and metapopulation structure driven by directional oceanic currents in a marine fish targeted by small-scale fisheriesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Nat Resources & Environm, Conservat Genet Laben_US
dc.identifier.journalMARINE BIOLOGYen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; published online: 22 November 2017en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.journaltitleMarine Biology
dc.source.volume165
dc.source.issue1


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