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dc.contributor.advisorKickham, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.advisorZepeda, Ofelia
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, Bri
dc.creatorAlexander, Bri
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-10T19:16:21Z
dc.date.available2018-08-10T19:16:21Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/628437
dc.description.abstractAn astounding number of global Indigenous communities work ceaselessly to reclaim and revitalize their languages after many years of suppression by colonization and dominant societies. Each community and individual learner brings myriad unique needs and desires to heritage language learning, including the need for community and cultural engagement in addition to fluency. With an increase in using technology for language learning, computer-assisted language learning (CALL) programs could be useful resources for Indigenous language learners if first adapted to support Indigenous languages. While CALL allows immense customization of programs to satisfying learner needs and linguistic diversity, BLOOM is the first and only organization to develop an Indigenous language CALL program (i.e., a program built solely for Indigenous languages and to meet the needs of Indigenous communities). Investigating BLOOM, this research analyzes a case study of the developmental process of BLOOM’s first course, including curriculum development, design decisions, engineering challenges, and the experience of partnering with the Cherokee Nation to develop a Cherokee language course. This research asserts that developers must collaborate directly with the Indigenous community during every step of the building process when developing Indigenous language CALL programs, and provides a 10-step Community-Collaborative Building Model to guide the process. The model reveals the importance of building curriculum tailored to the distinct needs of the Indigenous community, working actively and intentionally to build trust with the community, and constantly using the program to empower Indigenous communities via language learning. Overall, when producing Indigenous language CALL programs, CALL developers must adapt to meet the needs of the community, the learners, and those needs in context.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction, presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
dc.subjectcomputer-assisted language learning
dc.subjectendangered languages
dc.subjectheritage language learning
dc.subjectlanguage revitalization
dc.subjectNative American languages
dc.titleContextualizing Technology: Designing Indigenous Language CALL Programs
dc.typetext
dc.typeElectronic Thesis
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizona
thesis.degree.levelmasters
dc.contributor.committeememberGilmore, Perry
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate College
thesis.degree.disciplineLinguistics
thesis.degree.nameM.A.
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-10T19:16:21Z


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