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dc.contributor.authorAmoussouhoui, Arnaud Setondji
dc.contributor.authorSopoh, Ghislain Emmanuel
dc.contributor.authorWadagni, Anita Carolle
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Roch Christian
dc.contributor.authorAoulou, Paulin
dc.contributor.authorAgbo, Inès Elvire
dc.contributor.authorHouezo, Jean-Gabin
dc.contributor.authorBoyer, Micah
dc.contributor.authorNichter, Mark
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-15T17:34:50Z
dc.date.available2018-08-15T17:34:50Z
dc.date.issued2018-03
dc.identifier.citationAmoussouhoui AS, Sopoh GE, Wadagni AC, Johnson RC, Aoulou P, Agbo IE, et al. (2018) Implementation of a decentralized community-based treatment program to improve the management of Buruli ulcer in the Ouinhi district of Benin, West Africa. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 12(3): e0006291. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0006291en_US
dc.identifier.issn1935-2735
dc.identifier.pmid29529087
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pntd.0006291
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/628535
dc.description.abstractBackground Mycobacterium ulcerans infection, commonly known as Buruli ulcer (BU), is a debilitating neglected tropical disease. Its management remains complex and has three main components: antibiotic treatment combining rifampicin and streptomycin for 56 days, wound dressings and skin grafts for large ulcerations, and physical therapy to prevent functional limitations after care. In Benin, BU patient care is being integrated into the government health system. In this paper, we report on an innovative pilot program designed to introduce BU decentralization in Ouinhi district, one of Benin's most endemic districts previously served by centralized hospital-based care. Methodology/Principal findings We conducted intervention-oriented research implemented in four steps: baseline study, training of health district clinical staff, outreach education, outcome and impact assessments. Study results demonstrated that early BU lesions (71% of all detected cases) could be treated in the community following outreach education, and that most of the afflicted were willing to accept decentralized treatment. Ninety-three percent were successfully treated with antibiotics alone. The impact evaluation found that community confidence in decentralized BU care was greatly enhanced by clinic staff who came to be seen as having expertise in the care of most chronic wounds. Conclusions/Significance This study documents a successful BU outreach and decentralized care program reaching early BU cases not previously treated by a proactive centralized BU program. The pilot program further demonstrates the added value of integrated wound management for NTD control.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUBS Optimus Foundation (UBS-OF)en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCEen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0006291en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0006291.g001en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0006291.g002en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0006291.g003en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0006291.g004en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0006291.g005en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0006291.g006en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0006291.t001en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0006291.t002en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0006291.t003en_US
dc.rights© 2018 Amoussouhoui et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.en_US
dc.titleImplementation of a decentralized community-based treatment program to improve the management of Buruli ulcer in the Ouinhi district of Benin, West Africaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Anthropolen_US
dc.identifier.journalPLOS NEGLECTED TROPICAL DISEASESen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitlePLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
dc.source.volume12
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpagee0006291
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-15T17:34:51Z


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