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dc.contributor.authorBitter, Cindy Carol
dc.contributor.authorRice, Brian
dc.contributor.authorPeriyanayagam, Usha
dc.contributor.authorDreifuss, Bradley
dc.contributor.authorHammerstedt, Heather
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Sara W
dc.contributor.authorBisanzo, Mark
dc.contributor.authorMaling, Samuel
dc.contributor.authorChamberlain, Stacey
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-29T21:28:14Z
dc.date.available2018-08-29T21:28:14Z
dc.date.issued2018-05
dc.identifier.citationBitter CC, Rice B, Periyanayagam U, et al What resources are used in emergency departments in rural sub-Saharan Africa? A retrospective analysis of patient care in a district-level hospital in Uganda. BMJ Open 2018;8:e019024. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-019024en_US
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055
dc.identifier.pmid29478017
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2017-019024
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/628618
dc.description.abstractObjectives To determine the most commonly used resources (provider procedural skills, medications, laboratory studies and imaging) needed to care for patients. Setting A single emergency department (ED) of a district-level hospital in rural Uganda. Participants 26 710 patient visits. Results Procedures were performed for 65.6% of patients, predominantly intravenous cannulation, wound care, bladder catheterisation and orthopaedic procedures. Medications were administered to 87.6% of patients, most often pain medications, antibiotics, intravenous fluids, antimalarials, nutritional supplements and vaccinations. Laboratory testing was used for 85% of patients, predominantly malaria smears, rapid glucose testing, HIV assays, blood counts, urinalyses and blood type. Radiology testing was performed for 17.3% of patients, including X-rays, point-of-care ultrasound and formal ultrasound. Conclusion This study describes the skills and resources needed to care for a large prospective cohort of patients seen in a district hospital ED in rural sub-Saharan Africa. It demonstrates that the vast majority of patients were treated with a small formulary of critical medications and limited access to laboratories and imaging, but providers require a broad set of decision-making and procedural skills.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBMJ PUBLISHING GROUPen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://bmjopen.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-019024en_US
dc.rights© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license.en_US
dc.titleWhat resources are used in emergency departments in rural sub-Saharan Africa? A retrospective analysis of patient care in a district-level hospital in Ugandaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Med, Dept Emergency Meden_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Hlth Promot Sci, Mel & Enid Zuckerman Coll Publ Hlthen_US
dc.identifier.journalBMJ OPENen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access journal.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleBMJ Open
dc.source.volume8
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpagee019024
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-29T21:28:14Z


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