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dc.contributor.authorMulders, Gijs D.
dc.contributor.authorPascucci, Ilaria
dc.contributor.authorApai, Dániel
dc.contributor.authorCiesla, Fred J.
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-04T16:31:11Z
dc.date.available2018-09-04T16:31:11Z
dc.date.issued2018-07
dc.identifier.citationGijs D. Mulders et al 2018 AJ 156 24en_US
dc.identifier.issn1538-3881
dc.identifier.doi10.3847/1538-3881/aac5ea
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/628623
dc.description.abstractThe Kepler survey provides a statistical census of planetary systems out to the habitable zone. Because most planets are non-transiting, orbital architectures are best estimated using simulated observations of ensemble populations. Here, we introduce EPOS, the Exoplanet Population Observation Simulator, to estimate the prevalence and orbital architectures of multi-planet systems based on the latest Kepler data release, DR25. We estimate that at least 42% of Sun-like stars have nearly coplanar planetary systems with seven or more exoplanets. The fraction of stars with at least one planet within 1 au could be as high as 100% depending on assumptions about the distribution of single transiting planets. We estimate an occurrence rate of planets in the habitable zone around Sun-like stars of eta(circle plus) - 36 +/- 14%. The innermost planets in multi-planet systems are clustered around an orbital period of 10 days (0.1 au), reminiscent of the protoplanetary disk inner edge, or which could be explained by a planet trap at that location. Only a small fraction of planetary systems have the innermost planet at long orbital periods, with fewer than approximate to 8% and approximate to 3% having no planet interior to the orbit of Mercury and Venus, respectively. These results reinforce the view that the solar system is not a typical planetary system, but an outlier among the distribution of known exoplanetary systems. We predict that at least half of the habitable zone exoplanets are accompanied by (non-transiting) planets at shorter orbital periods, hence knowledge of a close-in exoplanet could be used as a way to optimize the search for Earth-size planets in the Habitable Zone with future direct imaging missions.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Aeronautics and Space Administration [NNX15AD94G]; NASAs Science Mission Directorateen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherIOP PUBLISHING LTDen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://stacks.iop.org/1538-3881/156/i=1/a=24?key=crossref.270b4b84d9eb34e279577fca7a93ecf1en_US
dc.rights© 2018. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.subjectmethods: statisticalen_US
dc.subjectplanetary systemsen_US
dc.subjectplanets and satellites: formationen_US
dc.subjectprotoplanetary disksen_US
dc.subjectsurveysen_US
dc.titleThe Exoplanet Population Observation Simulator. I. The Inner Edges of Planetary Systemsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Lunar & Planetary Laben_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Astronen_US
dc.identifier.journalASTRONOMICAL JOURNALen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleThe Astronomical Journal
dc.source.volume156
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage24
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-04T16:31:11Z


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