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dc.contributor.advisorKiefer, Frederick
dc.contributor.authorKetterling, Camerin Alexa
dc.creatorKetterling, Camerin Alexa
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-17T02:38:32Z
dc.date.available2018-10-17T02:38:32Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/630277
dc.description.abstractKing James I of England and VI of Scotland influenced the writing of William Shakespeare’s Macbeth. The king was an open homosexual who disliked women. Similar to many men of his time, James distrusted women’s power and sexuality and he argued for the reality of witches. In Macbeth, men must separate themselves from women in order to be successful and they must use violence to prove their masculinity. References to Christianity, the devil, and Lilith underlie the belief that women will cause men to sin and consequently suffer for doing so. Although Shakespeare condemns women and witches in Macbeth, he is much more sympathetic to women in some of his other plays. Thus, Shakespeare’s actual views on women remain unclear.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
dc.titleSEPARATION, VIOLENCE AND THE DEVIL: MISOGYNY IN MACBETH
dc.typetext
dc.typeElectronic Thesis
thesis.degree.levelbachelors
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors College
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish Literature
thesis.degree.nameB.A.
refterms.dateFOA2018-10-17T02:38:32Z


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