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dc.contributor.advisorHuskey, Kristine
dc.contributor.authorLatimer, Mariah Hope
dc.creatorLatimer, Mariah Hope
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-17T02:39:11Z
dc.date.available2018-10-17T02:39:11Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/630350
dc.description.abstractThe September 11, 2001 terror attacks had a far-reaching, global impact. Within the United States, lawmakers rapidly sought to address the aftermath by passing strong anti-terrorism policies. Other nations followed suit. At first, few people dared to question the implications of these policies. Nearly two decades later, technological advancements and a heightened concern over governmental restrictions on liberty are forcing policymakers to reexamine the legality of governmental invasions of privacy in the name of national security. This Paper examines the reach of U.S. anti-terrorism policies and their impact on individual privacy, the realities of similar policies in the United Kingdom, and the effectiveness of these policies in protecting national security. Additionally, this Paper explores the tension between privacy and security interests, both at home and abroad.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
dc.titleCHOOSING SECURITY OVER FREEDOM: THE INTERSECTION OF TECHNOLOGY AND PRIVACY IN A POST-9/11 WORLD
dc.typetext
dc.typeElectronic Thesis
thesis.degree.levelbachelors
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors College
thesis.degree.disciplineCriminal Justice
thesis.degree.nameB.S.
refterms.dateFOA2018-10-17T02:39:11Z


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