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dc.contributor.authorTecot, Stacey R.
dc.contributor.authorBaden, Andrea L.
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-20T16:40:30Z
dc.date.available2018-11-20T16:40:30Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-01
dc.identifier.citationTecot, S. R., & Baden, A. L. (2018). Profiling caregivers: hormonal variation underlying allomaternal care in wild red-bellied lemurs, Eulemur rubriventer, Physiology & behavior, 193(Pt A), pp.135-148; doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2017.12.007en_US
dc.identifier.issn00319384
dc.identifier.pmid29730034
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.physbeh.2017.12.007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/631035
dc.description.abstractNeuroendocrine evidence suggests that paternal care is mediated by hormonal mechanisms, where hormonal changes in expectant and new fathers facilitate infant care. In species with obligate and extensive paternal care such as humans, androgen levels decline once males are paired and have offspring, and in direct response to offspring care. Facultative infant care is widespread in the Order Primates, but the underlying hormonal mechanisms are largely unknown. We found that wild, red-bellied lemurs living in family groups (two adults and their presumed offspring) varied in the amount of care they provided infants. The more fathers invested in helping infants (measured as a composite of carrying, holding, huddling, grooming, and playing), and specifically the more they huddled and groomed with infants, the higher their fecal androgen (fA) levels, contrary to expectations. Carrying was negatively related to fA levels. Helping by subadults and juveniles was not related to their own fA levels. Elevated fA levels during infant dependence have been observed in other vertebrate species, and are thought to reflect reinvestment in mating rather than investment in dependent offspring. However, red-bellied lemurs do not mate until after infants are weaned, and they have long-term pair-bonds, suggesting that elevated fA levels play a role in offspring care. These results support a growing body of research suggesting that elevated androgen levels do not inhibit protective infant care.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipLSB Leakey Foundation; AAPA Professional Development Grant; Rowe/Wright Primate Fund; Hunter College; NYCEP; University of Arizona Social and Behavioral Sciences Research Institute, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences; School of Anthropologyen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTDen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0031938417304298en_US
dc.rights© 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.subjectAndrogenen_US
dc.subjectPaternal careen_US
dc.subjectHelperen_US
dc.subjectPrimateen_US
dc.subjectStrepsirrhineen_US
dc.subjectAllomaternal careen_US
dc.titleProfiling caregivers: Hormonal variation underlying allomaternal care in wild red-bellied lemurs, Eulemur rubriventeren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Anthropolen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Lab Evolutionary Endocrinol Primatesen_US
dc.identifier.journalPHYSIOLOGY & BEHAVIORen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; published online: 2 May 2018en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.journaltitlePhysiology & Behavior
dc.source.volume193
dc.source.beginpage135
dc.source.endpage148


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