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dc.contributor.authorMenjívar, Cecilia
dc.contributor.authorSimmons, William Paul
dc.contributor.authorAlvord, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorSalerno Valdez, Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-05T22:33:32Z
dc.date.available2018-12-05T22:33:32Z
dc.date.issued2018-08-18
dc.identifier.citationMenjívar, C., Simmons, W., Alvord, D., & Salerno Valdez, E. (2018). IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT, THE RACIALIZATION OF LEGAL STATUS, AND PERCEPTIONS OF THE POLICE: Latinos in Chicago, Los Angeles, Houston, and Phoenix in Comparative Perspective. Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race, 15(1), 107-128. doi:10.1017/S1742058X18000115en_US
dc.identifier.issn1742-058X
dc.identifier.issn1742-0598
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1742058X18000115
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/631120
dc.description.abstractThe immigration enforcement system today affects different subgroups of Latinos; it reaches beyond the undocumented to immigrants who hold legal statuses and even to the U.S.-born. States have enacted their own enforcement collaboration agreements with federal authorities and thus Latinos may have dissimilar experiences based on where they live. This article examines the effects of enforcement schemes on Latinos' likelihood of reporting crimes to police and views of law enforcement. It includes documented and U.S-born Latinos to capture the spillover beyond the undocumented, and it is based on four metropolitan areasLos Angeles, Houston, Phoenix, and Chicagoto comparatively assess the effects of various enforcement contexts. Empirically, it relies on data from a random sample survey of over 2000 Latinos conducted in 2012 in these four cities. Results show that spillover effects vary by context and legal/citizenship status: Latino immigrants with legal status are less inclined to report to the police as compared to U.S.-born Latinos in Houston, Los Angeles, and Phoenix but not in Chicago. At the other end, the spillover effect in Phoenix is so strong that it almost reaches to U.S.-born Latinos. The spillover effect identified is possible due to the close association between being Latino or Mexican and being undocumented, underscoring the racialization of legal status and of immigration enforcement today.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESSen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1742058X18000115/type/journal_articleen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © Hutchins Center for African and African American Research 2018.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectUS-Born Latinosen_US
dc.subjectLatino Immigrantsen_US
dc.subjectRacializationen_US
dc.subjectImmigration Enforcementen_US
dc.subjectCitizenship Legal Statusen_US
dc.subjectChicagoen_US
dc.subjectLos Angelesen_US
dc.subjectPhoenixen_US
dc.subjectHoustonen_US
dc.titleIMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT, THE RACIALIZATION OF LEGAL STATUS, AND PERCEPTIONS OF THE POLICEen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Gender & Womens Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Online Grad Programs Human Rights Practiceen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Mel & Enid Zuckerman Coll Publ Hlthen_US
dc.identifier.journalDU BOIS REVIEW-SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH ON RACEen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleDu Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race
dc.source.volume15
dc.source.issue01
dc.source.beginpage107
dc.source.endpage128
refterms.dateFOA2018-12-05T22:33:32Z


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