• Librarians in the messy middle: Examining critical librarianship practice through the lens of privilege in academia

      Miller, Sara D.; MInkin, Rachel M.; Michigan State Univerisity (The University of Arizona, 2016-05-10)
      While critical practice involves challenging systems and structures, many librarians function in the “messy middle” - making choices in everyday practice which may both support and challenge privileged academic structures. This workshop will take participants through a series of questions based on privilege as a lens for reflection on our choices, limitations, and opportunities as librarians within academic systems. The aim of the workshop is to help identify points of friction or frustration in our practice, areas for closer examination or opportunities for change, and to provide a more intentional understanding of our values and how they relate to practice.
    • The library is not a restaurant: Reference appointments and neoliberal language

      Gardner, Carolyn Caffrey; Clarke, Maggie; California State University, Dominguez Hills (The University of Arizona, 2020-09-04)
      This presentation will detail research on “no-show” student research appointments with an eye towards how libraries can mitigate student perceptions of appointments as commercial transactions which have been reinforced by problematic language borrowed from other sectors (hospitality, medical). We will share survey results from a range of higher education institutions regarding their current attitudes and practices towards no-show appointments. We will present strategies we’ve used to encourage appointment attendance by fostering a sense of shared community of learners rather than using shame, financial penalty, or other punitive action to decrease no-shows. Finally, we’ll hear from students on their perceptions of taking up space in research appointments and analyze how research appointment practices can reward students who already have privilege. Participants will critically reflect on their own experiences and practices with research appointments through guided reflection and small group discussion in order to empower students.
    • Neutrality is Polite Oppression: How critical librarianship and pedagogy principles counter neutral narratives and benefit the profession

      Ferretti, Jennifer A.; Maryland Institute College of Art (The University of Arizona, 2018-11-28)
      The debate about whether or not libraries and information professionals should be neutral seems perpetual. Championing neutrality over a critical perspective intentionally furthers the oppression of not only marginalized patron populations, but of marginalized colleagues. Rooted in principles of critical pedagogy and critical librarianship, this talk will illustrate how neutrality impacts the information professions and the communities we serve, as well as ways in which our expectations of our students to critically evaluate sources can be applied to our own work. We ask our students to think about what information is missing within a resource. It’s time we not only ask our profession the same (who isn’t at the table, what isn’t being discussed, etc.), but also that we take action to counter narratives of neutrality in our everyday practices, including in the classroom and our work spaces.
    • On Critical Librarianship & Pedagogies of the Practical

      Hudson, David James; University of Guelph (The University of Arizona, 2016-02)
    • Peers, Guest Lecturers, or Babysitters: Constructions of Power in the Library Classroom

      Arellano Douglas, Veronica; Gadsby, Joanna; Evans, Sian; University of Houston; University of Maryland, Baltimore County; Maryland Institute College of Art (The University of Arizona, 2018-11)
    • A Practice of Connection: Applying Relational Cultural Theory to Librarianship

      Arellano Douglas, Veronica; Chiu, Anastasia; Gadsby, Joanna; Kumbier, Alana; Nataraj, Lalitha; University of Houston; Stony Brook University; University of Maryland, Baltimore County; California State University, San Marcos; Hampshire College (The University of Arizona, 2018-11)
    • Practising Digital Pedagogy Librarianship: Building Critical and Queer Feminist Communities

      Patel, Kush; Cong-Huyen, Anne; University of Michigan (The University of Arizona, 2018-11-16)
      This workshop, led by the Digital Pedagogy Librarians at the University of Michigan Libraries, aims to address the nature and nurturing of digital pedagogy librarianship beyond its relationship to digital tools to ask: what roles do critical and queer feminist principles play in enriching our approaches to digital pedagogy and how might we constitute mutually transformative communities of practice around those principles?
    • Reimagining Peer Review

      Ford, Emily; Portland State University (The University of Arizona, 2020-09)
      As you may recall, the 2020 Critical Library and Pedagogy Symposium instituted an open peer review process—not masking submitters’ names and other identifying information—to review proposed sessions. This decision came after the committee noted a lack of diversity in accepted sessions using a closed review process. Using open peer review allowed the committee to balance accepted proposals and offer a diverse range of views and experiences among presenters. This hour-long facilitated discussion will examine bias and power structures inherent in peer review. It will be an interactive session that allows participants to critically examine their views and previous experiences with peer review, and begin to reimagine it. What can opening peer review do to create more equitable scholarly spaces? What problems does opening peer review improve, and what new challenges does it present? Note that this session will be interactive, and will use the Zoom breakout room feature as well as Google Docs for collaboration.
    • Resisting capitalist and neoliberal conceptions of information literacy

      Gregory, Lua; Higgins, Shana; University of Redlands (2018-11)
      This roundtable discussion explored the alignment of information literacy with neoliberal and capitalist conceptions of labor and corporate interests. The roundtable was accompanied by a 12 page zine which highlighted quotes from the history of librarianship in the U.S. and its connections with the rise of capitalism. Roundtable questions posed in the session, and a reference list for further reading, are also included in the zine. Email the authors for a print copy.
    • Scaffolding Your Instruction with Epistemology

      Dean, Kirsten; University Libraries at Virginia Tech (The University of Arizona, 2020-09)
      Slides from pre-recorded video (https://youtu.be/W1_6lMTVZ7M) and live virtual discussion session (Sept. 16, 2020).
    • Support beyond the studio: Critical pedagogy in art librarianship

      Jennings, Michele; Hunt, Courtney; Ohio University; The Ohio State University (The University of Arizona, 2020-09)
      This session grew out of conversations between two art librarians working in close proximity at different institutions, centered around the idea that while the needs for art and design students require a different type of academic support than others (Hemmig, 2009), this approach to learning and information lends itself to critical pedagogy and takeaways for other disciplines. Dismantling the paradigm that positions librarians in the role of the sage, critical pedagogy establishes more of a horizontal line of support from the student to the librarian. Those students whose academic work is rooted in creative practice operate on a continuum that does not culminate in a single research paper or study. Instead, they may work on a piece in their first year and continue to iterate until their thesis show. Therefore, it is critical to consider how we teach and support students that we work with holistically. Art and design students especially “need to learn how to find their voices, which in turn becomes liberating, allowing them to fully engage in their own intellectual and educational process” (Reale, 2012, p. 85). This session explores strategies for supporting students working in creative disciplines for the entirety of their academic stay and beyond, and what takeaways there may be for librarians working in other areas. For example, Grimm and Meeks (2017) address critlib and social justice in visual literacy—how library practitioners may address inequity and racism in representation, teaching students to look (and make) critically. While visual literacy naturally lends itself to art and design library users, it is equally vital that students in other areas gain the skills necessary to grapple with and decode the visual media that surrounds them inside and outside of the classroom. Centering the idea of holistic student support, these two librarians began to think about what it means to apply critical pedagogy to art librarianship. Studio art and design pedagogy align with the tactics and motivations of critical librarianship and pedagogy; by attempting to recreate the studio environment through activities emphasizing collaboration and critique, this session will demonstrate how librarians can critically engage with students in the long term in any discipline.
    • Teaching CRAAP to Robots: Artificial Intelligence, False Binaries, and Implications for Information Literacy

      Seeber, Kevin; University of Colorado Denver (The University of Arizona, 2018-11)
      Researchers studying artificial intelligence and semantic computing are developing algorithms capable of processing large amounts of textual data and rendering judgment on its contents. Specifically, the field of sentiment analysis is focused on creating code that applies what programmers call “common sense” to evaluate whether writing is factual or opinionated, as well as how emotional the author was. This presentation will argue that these algorithms rely on false binaries, over-simplification, and poorly-constructed checklists, similar to the approach often used when discussing information literacy with first-year college students. Instead of employing this approach, this session will argue that librarians must recognize that human interpretation lies at the core of information literacy, and that we need to embrace that complexity rather than depend on algorithmic evaluation.
    • Using Synchronous Posting to Locate Student Pain Points

      Binnie, Naomi; University of Michigan (The University of Arizona, 2018-11)
      The nature of undergraduate library instruction sessions means we often do not see the same students more than once. We rarely begin the class knowing students’ names, their majors, their confidence levels or how they’re feeling that day. I will discuss beginning my instruction sessions with a student activity featuring synchronous, anonymous posting in an effort to create a safe space and to empower students by centering their voices, particularly the voices of students from marginalized communities who may not feel safe in the typical classroom environment. I will discuss how I assess student needs, pain points, and confidence levels in the beginning of class rather than at the end.