• Peers, Guest Lecturers, or Babysitters: Constructions of Power in the Library Classroom

      Arellano Douglas, Veronica; Gadsby, Joanna; Evans, Sian; University of Houston; University of Maryland, Baltimore County; Maryland Institute College of Art (The University of Arizona, 2018-11)
    • A Practice of Connection: Applying Relational Cultural Theory to Librarianship

      Arellano Douglas, Veronica; Chiu, Anastasia; Gadsby, Joanna; Kumbier, Alana; Nataraj, Lalitha; University of Houston; Stony Brook University; University of Maryland, Baltimore County; California State University, San Marcos; Hampshire College (The University of Arizona, 2018-11)
    • Practising Digital Pedagogy Librarianship: Building Critical and Queer Feminist Communities

      Patel, Kush; Cong-Huyen, Anne; University of Michigan (The University of Arizona, 2018-11-16)
      This workshop, led by the Digital Pedagogy Librarians at the University of Michigan Libraries, aims to address the nature and nurturing of digital pedagogy librarianship beyond its relationship to digital tools to ask: what roles do critical and queer feminist principles play in enriching our approaches to digital pedagogy and how might we constitute mutually transformative communities of practice around those principles?
    • Resisting capitalist and neoliberal conceptions of information literacy

      Gregory, Lua; Higgins, Shana; University of Redlands (2018-11)
      This roundtable discussion explored the alignment of information literacy with neoliberal and capitalist conceptions of labor and corporate interests. The roundtable was accompanied by a 12 page zine which highlighted quotes from the history of librarianship in the U.S. and its connections with the rise of capitalism. Roundtable questions posed in the session, and a reference list for further reading, are also included in the zine. Email the authors for a print copy.
    • Teaching CRAAP to Robots: Artificial Intelligence, False Binaries, and Implications for Information Literacy

      Seeber, Kevin; University of Colorado Denver (The University of Arizona, 2018-11)
      Researchers studying artificial intelligence and semantic computing are developing algorithms capable of processing large amounts of textual data and rendering judgment on its contents. Specifically, the field of sentiment analysis is focused on creating code that applies what programmers call “common sense” to evaluate whether writing is factual or opinionated, as well as how emotional the author was. This presentation will argue that these algorithms rely on false binaries, over-simplification, and poorly-constructed checklists, similar to the approach often used when discussing information literacy with first-year college students. Instead of employing this approach, this session will argue that librarians must recognize that human interpretation lies at the core of information literacy, and that we need to embrace that complexity rather than depend on algorithmic evaluation.
    • Using Synchronous Posting to Locate Student Pain Points

      Binnie, Naomi; University of Michigan (The University of Arizona, 2018-11)
      The nature of undergraduate library instruction sessions means we often do not see the same students more than once. We rarely begin the class knowing students’ names, their majors, their confidence levels or how they’re feeling that day. I will discuss beginning my instruction sessions with a student activity featuring synchronous, anonymous posting in an effort to create a safe space and to empower students by centering their voices, particularly the voices of students from marginalized communities who may not feel safe in the typical classroom environment. I will discuss how I assess student needs, pain points, and confidence levels in the beginning of class rather than at the end.