ABOUT THE COLLECTION

The Critical Librarianship and Pedagogy Symposium brings "together the ongoing, but parallel discourse surrounding critical pedagogy among academic librarians, critical pedagogy scholars, and teaching faculty."

The symposium was held November 15-16, 2018 at The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ. The symposium was sponsored by The University of Arizona Libraries.

For more information about the symposium, visit the 2018 Critical Librarianship and Pedagogy Symposium website.

This collection is now open for submission.

Submission instructions:

  • Login to the UA Campus Repository at https://repository.arizona.edu/login
    - UA affiliates = Login with NetID
    - Non-UA affiliates = Login with Repository Account (register for a repository account at https://repository.arizona.edu/register)
  • Click "Submissions" in the left-side navigation menu.
  • Click "Start a new submission"
  • Select "2018 Critical Librarianship & Pedagogy Symposium"
  • Enter descriptive information about the submission, including title, authors, affiliations, keywords
    Please note that many values will appear with a checkbox next to them; do not select the checkboxes unless you want to remove the value. Leaving the boxes unchecked will result in the values being added correctly to the system.
  • You will be asked for a rights/licensing statement. You can add your preferred copyright statement, including Creative Commons licensing. There is also a workflow step that allows you to select a specific Creative Commons license later in the submission process. If no rights or licensing information is added by the submitter, the repository administrator will add a "Copyright © held by author" statement.
  • Upload your file (s). Preferred format is PDF.
    If your file includes images under copyright, please replace those images with public domain or images for which you have permissions to reproduce.
  • Verify all information is correct.
  • Choose a Creative Commons license (optional)
  • "Grant the License" to complete submission of your item. This license gives the University of Arizona non-exclusive distribution rights to make your item available in the repository.
  • The CLAPS collection administrator will approve your submission. You will receive an email when the submission has been approved and the item is available in the repository.

Please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu with any questions regarding submission.

Recent Submissions

  • Deconstruct to Reconstruct: Challenging Critical Librarianship

    Leung, Sofia; Pho, Annie; MIT; UCLA (The University of Arizona, 2018-11)
    The practice of critical librarianship is often viewed and approached in segmented pieces, due to the nature of specializations within the profession. Those who engage and practice critical librarianship often may focus on certain areas like pedagogy, archival theory, classification or categorization, and scholarly communication, among other topics. This presentation will deconstruct the core values of librarianship and rhetoric within critical librarianship in order to begin reconstructing and reimagining how libraries can explicitly center marginalized communities. We want to build a broader framework that explicitly draws the connections/relationships between critical pedagogy (how we teach), critical information literacy (what we teach), and the infrastructure, policies, and practices of the libraries within which we work. We will challenge western knowledge practices and engage participants in collectively developing a new framework of librarianship that will inform and shape our pedagogy.
  • Teaching CRAAP to Robots: Artificial Intelligence, False Binaries, and Implications for Information Literacy

    Seeber, Kevin; University of Colorado Denver (The University of Arizona, 2018-11)
    Researchers studying artificial intelligence and semantic computing are developing algorithms capable of processing large amounts of textual data and rendering judgment on its contents. Specifically, the field of sentiment analysis is focused on creating code that applies what programmers call “common sense” to evaluate whether writing is factual or opinionated, as well as how emotional the author was. This presentation will argue that these algorithms rely on false binaries, over-simplification, and poorly-constructed checklists, similar to the approach often used when discussing information literacy with first-year college students. Instead of employing this approach, this session will argue that librarians must recognize that human interpretation lies at the core of information literacy, and that we need to embrace that complexity rather than depend on algorithmic evaluation.
  • Practising Digital Pedagogy Librarianship: Building Critical and Queer Feminist Communities

    Patel, Kush; Cong-Huyen, Anne; University of Michigan (The University of Arizona, 2018-11-16)
    This workshop, led by the Digital Pedagogy Librarians at the University of Michigan Libraries, aims to address the nature and nurturing of digital pedagogy librarianship beyond its relationship to digital tools to ask: what roles do critical and queer feminist principles play in enriching our approaches to digital pedagogy and how might we constitute mutually transformative communities of practice around those principles?
  • Contested Sites of Critical Library Pedagogy

    Almeida, Nora; Beilin, Ian; New York City College of Technology, CUNY, Brooklyn, NY; Columbia University, New York, NY (The University of Arizona, 2018-11-16)
    In this presentation we will explore critical library pedagogy in relation to different physical places and dialogic spaces. Using the idea of the library as a “third space” as a point of departure, we will consider whether alternative spatial contexts or modes of analysis might enable new forms of critique that are embodied, culturally grounded, and creative.
  • Design Thinking in an Hour? Or, Design Thinking: A Cautionary Tale

    Arteaga, Roberto; Pacific Lutheran University (The University of Arizona, 2018-11-16)
    Design thinking (DT) is a methodology that has become popular across many sectors due to its iterability and flexibility. As its adoption spreads throughout higher education settings, DT is now starting to appear in library literature and conferences. As teaching librarians, we may be tempted to adapt popular methodologies in the hope of increasing the reach of our work, considering how undervalued and misunderstood our work can be, but we should also consider whether DT is a potentially harmful practice. By discussing DT, what it can do, and where it can be most useful, I will present a case for why librarians who teach need not engage in a practice that treats learning as something that needs a solution and appears to sideline students and their lived experiences. Those who practice critical librarianship would be better served by adopting a student-centered pedagogy that shifts power and agency to the students, while simultaneously educating others on the work they do, why they do it, and how it contributes to student learning.
  • Critical Approaches to Evaluating Student Privacy & 3rd Party Apps

    Unknown author (The University of Arizona, 2018-11-16)
    This information literacy resource was created by participants and facilitators during a workshop titled "Student privacy & third-party apps : Examining a university’s Terms of Service" at CLAPS 2018. Through reading actual contracts between technology vendors and the University or Arizona, the group of academic librarians, library administrators, and faculty developers synthesized the steps to take and information to look for in these contracts to better understand how student and worker information is collected and used by third-party vendors.