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dc.contributor.authorBolson, J.
dc.contributor.authorSukop, M. C.
dc.contributor.authorArabi, M.
dc.contributor.authorPivo, G.
dc.contributor.authorLanier, A.
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-13T17:24:42Z
dc.date.available2018-12-13T17:24:42Z
dc.date.issued2018-05
dc.identifier.citationBolson, J., Sukop, M. C., Arabi, M., Pivo, G., & Lanier, A. (2018). A stakeholder‐science based approach using the national urban water innovation network as a test bed for understanding urban Water sustainability challenges in the U.S.. Water Resources Research, 54, 3453–3471. https://doi.org/10.1029/2017WR021191en_US
dc.identifier.issn00431397
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2017WR021191
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/631149
dc.description.abstractUrban water systems across the United States are struggling to adapt to an evolving set of threats. Understanding specific pressures and the regional responses to those pressures requires input from practitioners with knowledge of sociotechnological aspects of urban water systems. The Urban Water Innovation Network (UWIN), a consortium of academic institutions and partners supported by the National Science Foundation Sustainability Research Network program, provides a unique opportunity to engage stakeholder and research communities across the U.S. Interactions between UWIN researchers and water stakeholders from five regions (Southeast Florida, Sun Corridor, Mid-Atlantic, Pacific Northwest, and Front Range) form the basis for case studies on transitions toward sustainability. Analysis of qualitative data on pressures, states, and responses collected during interactions provides insight into the challenging context of urban water management. Top pressures identified include climate change, aging infrastructure, water quality impairments, and funding limitations. Additionally, stakeholders described resistance to change and short-term perspectives among elected officials, limited understanding/ awareness of water systems among decision makers, and lack of leadership on water issues as contributing to pressures. More than technological solutions, practitioners call for improved coordination in water management, strengthened communication with elected officials, and behavioral change among citizens. Regarding stakeholder-scientist interactions, participants sought practical outcomes, such as the organization of seemingly abundant scientific products into usable products. The utility of the pressure-state-response model as a framework for data collection and analysis in the context of understanding transitions toward urban water sustainability is discussed and recommendations for future studies are presented.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAMER GEOPHYSICAL UNIONen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1029/2017WR021191en_US
dc.rights© 2018. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.en_US
dc.titleA Stakeholder-Science Based Approach Using the National Urban Water Innovation Network as a Test Bed for Understanding Urban Water Sustainability Challenges in the U.S.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Landscape Architecture & Urban Planningen_US
dc.identifier.journalWATER RESOURCES RESEARCHen_US
dc.description.note6 month embargo; published online: 20 April 2018en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleWater Resources Research
dc.source.volume54
dc.source.issue5
dc.source.beginpage3453
dc.source.endpage3471
refterms.dateFOA2018-10-20T00:00:00Z


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