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dc.contributor.advisorJeffery, R. Brooks
dc.contributor.authorBierer, Susan Anne
dc.creatorBierer, Susan Anne
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-08T01:53:51Z
dc.date.available2019-01-08T01:53:51Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/631408
dc.description.abstractCurrently there is no normative framework by which to standardize successful outcomes of adaptive reuse projects. Critical comparative analysis in commercial building reuse within a regulatory historic preservation context is problematic. This thesis analyzes four case study examples of historic commercial properties that were reused as part of two City of Phoenix Historic Preservation Incentive programs. The four case study examples provide a similar context to compare the only consistent variable between the four buildings: two incentive programs developed by the City of Phoenix Historic Preservation Division – the Demonstration Project Program and the Threatened Building and Warehouse Program. The four City of Phoenix cases study examples collectively exhibited substantial investment on the part of the developer and private funding projected in excess of $16 million dollars, while the city investment of public funding from general obligation bonds was $1 million for four buildings and gaining 30-year conservation easements for each property. While this shows an excellent investment of public funds across four funded incentive program projects, there is no comparative framework by which to objectively break down and analyze the all the regulatory processes a developer goes through and the decisions a developer makes in response during an adaptive reuse project. An adaptive reuse framework must be an integrated framework that considers the needs of a municipalities’ historic preservation and economic development. Creating a framework requires identifying the similarities and differences between adaptive reuse projects of similar scale, condition and environment. Criteria cannot be defined if all the steps in the process are not identified. Recommendations are made here for creating an adaptive reuse framework based on the foundation of identifying qualified city historic preservation programs. Such programs must have delineated criteria for adaptive reuse projects within a regional context, and that capture all scales of reuse with comparable materials, architecture and environmental conditions. Second, identification of experienced developers whose primary work is with adaptive reuse projects and who are willing to share financial project data (pro forma/cost benefit) and post-project cost data. Finally, an appropriate sample size of projects to review must be determined after successful identification of historic preservation programs and a group of adaptive reuse developers willing to contribute their knowledge to an adaptive reuse framework.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction, presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
dc.subjectAdaptive reuse
dc.subjectAdaptive reuse framework
dc.subjectCommercial building reuse
dc.subjectEconomic development
dc.subjectHistoric preservation
dc.subjectIncentive programs
dc.titlePrinciples of City Historic Preservation Economic Incentive Programs: Four Case Study Examples from Phoenix, Arizona
dc.typetext
dc.typeElectronic Thesis
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizona
thesis.degree.levelmasters
dc.contributor.committeememberIda, Aletheia
dc.contributor.committeememberWissler, Craig
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate College
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitecture
thesis.degree.nameM.S.
refterms.dateFOA2019-01-08T01:53:51Z


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