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dc.contributor.authorHodgkins, Suzanne B.
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Curtis J.
dc.contributor.authorDommain, René
dc.contributor.authorWang, Hongjun
dc.contributor.authorGlaser, Paul H.
dc.contributor.authorVerbeke, Brittany
dc.contributor.authorWinkler, B. Rose
dc.contributor.authorCobb, Alexander R.
dc.contributor.authorRich, Virginia I.
dc.contributor.authorMissilmani, Malak
dc.contributor.authorFlanagan, Neal
dc.contributor.authorHo, Mengchi
dc.contributor.authorHoyt, Alison M.
dc.contributor.authorHarvey, Charles F.
dc.contributor.authorVining, S. Rose
dc.contributor.authorHough, Moira A.
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Tim R.
dc.contributor.authorRichard, Pierre J. H.
dc.contributor.authorDe La Cruz, Florentino B.
dc.contributor.authorToufaily, Joumana
dc.contributor.authorHamdan, Rasha
dc.contributor.authorCooper, William T.
dc.contributor.authorChanton, Jeffrey P.
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-09T22:12:50Z
dc.date.available2019-01-09T22:12:50Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-07
dc.identifier.citationHodgkins, S. B., Richardson, C. J., Dommain, R., Wang, H., Glaser, P. H., Verbeke, B., ... & Flanagan, N. (2018). Tropical peatland carbon storage linked to global latitudinal trends in peat recalcitrance. Nature communications, 9(1), 3640. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-06050-2en_US
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723
dc.identifier.pmid30194308
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41467-018-06050-2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/631451
dc.description.abstractPeatlands represent large terrestrial carbon banks. Given that most peat accumulates in boreal regions, where low temperatures and water saturation preserve organic matter, the existence of peat in (sub)tropical regions remains enigmatic. Here we examined peat and plant chemistry across a latitudinal transect from the Arctic to the tropics. Near-surface low-latitude peat has lower carbohydrate and greater aromatic content than near-surface high-latitude peat, creating a reduced oxidation state and resulting recalcitrance. This recalcitrance allows peat to persist in the (sub)tropics despite warm temperatures. Because we observed similar declines in carbohydrate content with depth in high-latitude peat, our data explain recent field-scale deep peat warming experiments in which catotelm (deeper) peat remained stable despite temperature increases up to 9 degrees C. We suggest that high-latitude deep peat reservoirs may be stabilized in the face of climate change by their ultimately lower carbohydrate and higher aromatic composition, similar to tropical peats.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUS Department of Energy Office of Biological and Environmental Research under the Terrestrial Ecosystem Sciences program [DE-SC0012272]; NASA Interdisciplinary Studies in Earth Science program [NNX17AK10G]; US Department of Energy Office of Biological and Environmental Research under the Genomic Science program [DE-SC0016440, DE-SC0004632, DE-SC0010580]; Geo. X, the Research Network for Geosciences in Berlin and Potsdam; US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research [DE-SC0012088]; NSF [0628647]; Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; National Research Foundation Singapore through the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology's Center for Environmental Sensing and Modeling interdisciplinary research program; USA National Science Foundation [1114155, 1114161]; NASA LaRC POWER Projecten_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUPen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-06050-2en_US
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2018. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0.en_US
dc.titleTropical peatland carbon storage linked to global latitudinal trends in peat recalcitranceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Soil Water & Environm Scien_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biolen_US
dc.identifier.journalNATURE COMMUNICATIONSen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access journal.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleNature Communications
dc.source.volume9
dc.source.issue1
refterms.dateFOA2019-01-09T22:12:50Z


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