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dc.contributor.advisorWilliams, Robert
dc.contributor.authorDiamond, James D.
dc.creatorDiamond, James D.
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-11T21:06:55Z
dc.date.available2019-01-11T21:06:55Z
dc.date.issued2015-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/631495
dc.description.abstractThis study produces insights, ideas and findings which link mass shootings and communal responses in the United States and on Indian reservations. The study compares and contrasts the aftermath of these tragedies in non-indigenous communities with the responses when the tragedies have occurred in certain American Indian communities. It looks to the roots of the Native American approach in international indigenous historical evidence. The author describes an institutional weakness in the Anglo-European judicial model in how it responds to the aftermath of heinous crimes. He explores adaptation of certain practices from indigenous peoples as a method of contributing to healing, closure and reconciliation following heinous criminal behavior. He further explores the possibility of incorporating face-to-face, interpersonal interaction between mass shooting victims, their families, and offenders and their families.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the James E. Rogers College of Law and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction, presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectViolent crimesen_US
dc.subjectCriminal justice, Administration of -- Cross-cultural studiesen_US
dc.subjectRestorative justice -- Cross-cultural studiesen_US
dc.subjectCustomary law, Internationalen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous peoples -- Legal status, laws, etc.en_US
dc.subjectPeace-buildingen_US
dc.titleIn the Aftermath of Rampage Shootings: Is Healing Possible? Hard Lessons from the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians and Other Indigenous Peoplesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Lawen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMiller, Marc
dc.contributor.committeememberAustin, Raymond
thesis.degree.disciplineIndigenous Peoples Law and Policy Programen_US
thesis.degree.nameS.J.D.en_US
dc.description.noteDigitized from a Special Collections copy at the Daniel F. Cracchiolo Law Library, James E. Rogers College of Law, The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the IPLP Dissertations collection. For more information about the collection or the program, please contact Justin Boro, UA College of Law, justinboro1986@email.arizona.edu.
dc.identifier.callnumberLaw Special Collections CRG 14:1:5 2015 D53
thesis.degree.programIndigenous Peoples Law and Policy (IPLP) Program
refterms.dateFOA2018-10-30T00:00:00Z


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