• CURRENT AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS IN FLIGHT TEST CONFIGURATION TECHNIQUES

      Whittington, Austin; Ibaroudene, Hakima; Abbott, Ben; Yao, Di; Hite, Joseph; Bapty, Theodore; Moskal, Jakub; Neumann, Michael; Southwest Research Institute; Vanderbilt University; et al. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2018-11)
      As technologies like network-based telemetry and standardized configuration languages begin to see wider adoption within the flight test community, new techniques exploring the new possibilities they provide are also developed. This paper reviews a subset of these techniques, including successful use in commercial flight test, focusing on the concepts of constraints and their application in the field, specifically their use in helping users to create correct-by-construction configurations. We then explore ongoing efforts with the Air Force and DARPA to extend these techniques into constraint satisfaction and real-time adaptation, providing the ability to create and adapt configurations to match (possibly changing) test requirements.
    • INTRODUCING TACL— A PROPOSAL FOR A NEW STANDARD T&E CONSTRAINT LANGUAGE

      Moskal, Jakub; Whittington, Austin; Kokar, Mitch; Abbott, Ben; VIStology, Inc.; Southwest Research Institute (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2018-11)
      It is expected that XML-based languages for configuring telemetry systems like MDL and TMATS will eventually replace their non-XML predecessors. However, despite its numerous benefits, XML does not solve all the related problems. In particular, it cannot harness the complexity of constraints that may pertain to vendor hardware or to express system-level constraints that span across entire networks of devices. In this paper, we present TACL, a T&E extension to W3C Shape Constraints Language (SHACL) for formulating constraints on configurations represented in MDL and TMATS, independently of any configuration software. TACL introduces high-level components that help to form constraints close to the user’s intent and are less concerned with the low-level syntax details. It exhibits much better resilience to changes in the XML schemas than the languages that refer directly to the XML trees. A proof of concept TACL engine has been successfully developed and applied to MDL/TACL configurations.