• Can Homomorphic Encryption Reduce the Security Risks in Telemetry Post Processing Environments?

      Kalibjian, Jeff; Perspecta Labs (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2018-11)
      Homomorphic encryption [1, 2] is a branch of cryptography in which data transformation operations can be performed on already encrypted data—promising better protection of data as the data no longer needs to be decrypted in order for specific analysis operations to be performed. Thus, better security is achieved by absolutely minimizing the amount of time sensitive data is potentially exposed. After reviewing homomorphic encryption principles, system level architectures will be presented discussing where homomorphic encryption may best fit in the generally accepted data security taxonomy involving disk, file, and application encryption. Emphasis will be placed on application to telemetry post-processing environments.
    • COMPREHENSIVE SPECTRUM MONITORING SYSTEM (COSMOS) FOR NEXT-GENERATION SPECTRUM SITUATIONAL AWARENESS

      Ziegler, Robert; Triolo, Anthony; Samtani, Sunil; Weaver, Joshua; Perspecta Labs; US Naval Sea Systems Command (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2018-11)
      Comprehensive Spectrum Monitoring System (COSMOS) is Perspecta Labs’ solution for Next-Generation Spectrum Situational Awareness (NGS2AS), a Spectrum Access R&D Program solicited and awarded through the National Spectrum Consortium. COSMOS will incorporate a mix of low-cost unattended RF sensors, networked using industry-standard interfaces; versatile back-end server processing and storage of sensor data; spectrum data analytics, reporting and visualization; and incorporation of historical and projected frequency usage data from DoD systems for planning of training and test missions. This paper describes the architecture and design of the COSMOS system and its sensor and server subsystems.
    • DOPPLER ESTIMATION AND COMPENSATION FOR LTE-BASED AERONAUTICAL MOBILE TELEMETRY

      Fung, Eddie; Johnson, William H.; Kogiantis, Achilles; Rege, Kiran M.; Perspecta Labs (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2018-11)
      High Doppler shifts between base stations and test articles (TAs) pose the biggest problem to Aeronautical mobile telemetry (AMT) implemented on a wireless LTE network. Our solution to this problem includes a Doppler estimator/compensator (DEC) that proactively shifts the LTE uplink (LTE UL) signals transmitted by the TA. We have designed the DEC in the form of an applique’ that can be inserted between the transmit/receive ports of a COTS TA transceiver and its antenna(s). The DEC estimates the Doppler shift using the LTE UL signals transmitted by the TA, which carry a frequency offset that includes the Doppler shift. This not only provides a clean, noise- and fading-free signal for Doppler estimation, but also allows us to do away with the need to know the identity of the base station with which the TA is communicating. In this paper, we provide an architectural description of the DEC and an outline of the algorithms that have been incorporated into it. At present, a laboratory prototype of the DEC has been developed using Universal Software Radio Peripherals (USRPs), coupled with a Linux PC to carry out most of the computations. An FPGA-based implementation is currently under development.
    • RF Planning for 3D coverage in Cellular LTE Range Telemetry

      Harasty, Dan; Kogiantis, Achilles; Maung, Nan; Rege, Kiran; Triolo, Anthony; Perspecta Labs (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2018-11)
      Initial analysis and lab experiments have provided positive confirmation of the viability of 4G LTE Cellular Technology for Aeronautical mobile telemetry. COTS LTE equipment is deployed for the test range frequency bands. The high speeds of test articles (TAs) can be addressed with a UE add-on applique’ customized to compensate for the Doppler shifts. The applique has worked effectively with the LTE physical layer. To achieve spectrum efficiency, a multi-cell network is planned. Mobility is managed with native LTE handovers. To address extreme Doppler cases, additional support is provided to mobility management via a central entity that estimates the TA’s trajectory and issues handover commands. Within this framework, we present aspects of an RF planning study that characterizes the dependence of coverage on such design parameters as base station density, antenna orientation, and altitude of the user device. We also quantify the Doppler shifts that can result under the standard strategy of connecting the user device to the strongest cell, and show how, with an alternative, threshold-based strategy, one can achieve a substantial reduction in Doppler shifts at the expense of a loss in user rates.
    • SIMULATED RADIOS FOR STRESS TESTING OF INET LINK MANAGER

      Fecko, Mariusz; Kim, Heechang; Cichocki, Andrzej; Wong, Larry; Radke, Mark; Young, Tom; Grace, Thomas; Perspecta Labs; Bevilacqua Res. Corp.; USAF AFMC; et al. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2018-11)
      IP-based telemetry systems such as iNET require extensive lab testing prior to fielding. Current iNET testbeds typically use several real radios and a mix of pre-recorded and live telemetry traffic. However, stress testing the iNET Radio Access Network (RAN) is hard to perform experimentally because of the limited number of available telemetry radios. To scale up the testing to a larger number of radios, we developed portable, low-cost VM-based telemetry radio simulators that interact with the iNET Link Manager (LM) and real radios to provide additional (emulated) links and queue depth reports. This approach makes it possible to establish the upper limit on the numbers of Test Articles that the LM can handle under various conditions. It also allows for fast reconfiguration of the number and set-up of simulated radios to test out specific use cases. The simulated radios free up real radios for off-site tests while preserving the ability for the continuous testing of LM features until real radios can be reclaimed. The developed testbed is portable owing to its lightweight set-up on the low-cost mac-mini computers. This makes it easy to use simulated radios also in off-site testbeds and field experiments.
    • SPECTRUM USAGE MEASUREMENT SYSTEM

      Madon, Phiroz; Fecko, Mariusz; Ziegler, Robert; Samtani, Sunil; Harasty, Daniel; Shen, John; Painter, Mike; Jones, Charles; Young, Tom; O’Brien, Thomas; et al. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2018-11)
      DoD flight test ranges need to track telemetry spectrum usage to defend against future sell-offs, as well as operate with high spectral efficiency. The Spectrum Usage Measurement System (SUMS) characterizes spectrum usage and requirements at test ranges, and assesses operational impacts and costs on Test and Evaluation. The system relies on mission planning and scheduling data acquired from test range planning systems, as well as measurements obtained from telemetry receivers and frequency scanning sensors. SUMS key capabilities include: (1) collecting over-the-air evidence of actual assigned frequency usage; (2) combining this data with mission plans to produce an accurate representation of telemetry spectrum usage through the space, time, and frequency dimensions; (3) providing users with a data warehouse of spectrum usage, potentially spanning multiple years, with test ranges across CONUS, and (4) providing data analytics and visualization techniques that combine 3-D terrain-based heat maps with usage metrics charts.