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dc.contributor.authorBrune, William H.
dc.contributor.authorRen, Xinrong
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Li
dc.contributor.authorMao, Jingqiu
dc.contributor.authorMiller, David O.
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Bruce E.
dc.contributor.authorBlake, Donald R.
dc.contributor.authorCohen, Ronald C.
dc.contributor.authorDiskin, Glenn S.
dc.contributor.authorHall, Samuel R.
dc.contributor.authorHanisco, Thomas F.
dc.contributor.authorHuey, L. Gregory
dc.contributor.authorNault, Benjamin A.
dc.contributor.authorPeisch, Jeff
dc.contributor.authorPollack, Ilana
dc.contributor.authorRyerson, Thomas B.
dc.contributor.authorShingler, Taylor
dc.contributor.authorSorooshian, Armin
dc.contributor.authorUllmann, Kirk
dc.contributor.authorWisthaler, Armin
dc.contributor.authorWooldridge, Paul J.
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-05T19:03:53Z
dc.date.available2019-03-05T19:03:53Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-10
dc.identifier.citationBrune, W. H., Ren, X., Zhang, L., Mao, J., Miller, D. O., Anderson, B. E., Blake, D. R., Cohen, R. C., Diskin, G. S., Hall, S. R., Hanisco, T. F., Huey, L. G., Nault, B. A., Peischl, J., Pollack, I., Ryerson, T. B., Shingler, T., Sorooshian, A., Ullmann, K., Wisthaler, A., and Wooldridge, P. J.: Atmospheric oxidation in the presence of clouds during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) study, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 14493-14510, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-14493-2018, 2018.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1680-7316
dc.identifier.issn1680-7324
dc.identifier.doi10.5194/acp-18-14493-2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/631781
dc.description.abstractDeep convective clouds are critically important to the distribution of atmospheric constituents throughout the troposphere but are difficult environments to study. The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) study in 2012 provided the environment, platforms, and instrumentation to test oxidation chemistry around deep convective clouds and their impacts downwind. Measurements on the NASA DC-8 air-craft included those of the radicals hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxyl (HO2), OH reactivity, and more than 100 other chemical species and atmospheric properties. OH, HO2, and OH reactivity were compared to photochemical models, some with and some without simplified heterogeneous chemistry, to test the understanding of atmospheric oxidation as encoded in the model. In general, the agreement between the observed and modeled OH, HO2, and OH reactivity was within the combined uncertainties for the model without heterogeneous chemistry and the model including heterogeneous chemistry with small OH and HO2 uptake consistent with laboratory studies. This agreement is generally independent of the altitude, ozone photolysis rate, nitric oxide and ozone abundances, modeled OH reactivity, and aerosol and ice surface area. For a sunrise to midday flight downwind of a nighttime mesoscale convective system, the observed ozone increase is consistent with the calculated ozone production rate. Even with some observed-to-modeled discrepancies, these results provide evidence that a current measurement constrained photochemical model can simulate observed atmospheric oxidation processes to within combined uncertainties, even around convective clouds. For this DC3 study, reduction in the combined uncertainties would be needed to confidently unmask errors or omissions in the model chemical mechanism.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipU.S. National Science Foundation (NSF); National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA); National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR); National Science Foundation; Austrian Federal Ministry for Transport, Innovation, and Technology (BMVIT) through the Austrian Space Applications Programme (ASAP) of the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG); NASA [NNX12AB84G]en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCOPERNICUS GESELLSCHAFT MBHen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/18/14493/2018/en_US
dc.rights© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.en_US
dc.titleAtmospheric oxidation in the presence of clouds during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Hydrol & Atmospher Scien_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Chem & Environm Engnen_US
dc.identifier.journalATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICSen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access journal.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-05T19:03:54Z


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