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dc.contributor.authorGutruf, Philipp
dc.contributor.authorKrishnamurthi, Vaishnavi
dc.contributor.authorVázquez-Guardado, Abraham
dc.contributor.authorXie, Zhaoqian
dc.contributor.authorBanks, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorSu, Chun-Ju
dc.contributor.authorXu, Yeshou
dc.contributor.authorHaney, Chad R.
dc.contributor.authorWaters, Emily A.
dc.contributor.authorKandela, Irawati
dc.contributor.authorKrishnan, Siddharth R.
dc.contributor.authorRay, Tyler
dc.contributor.authorLeshock, John P.
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Yonggang
dc.contributor.authorChanda, Debashis
dc.contributor.authorRogers, John A.
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-08T00:54:51Z
dc.date.available2019-03-08T00:54:51Z
dc.date.issued2018-12
dc.identifier.citationGutruf, P., Krishnamurthi, V., Vázquez-Guardado, A., Xie, Z., Banks, A., Su, C. J., ... & Krishnan, S. R. (2018). Fully implantable optoelectronic systems for battery-free, multimodal operation in neuroscience research. Nature Electronics, 1(12), 652.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2520-1131
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41928-018-0175-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/631798
dc.description.abstractRecently developed ultrasmall, fully implantable devices for optogenetic neuromodulation eliminate the physical tethers associated with conventional set-ups and avoid the bulky head-stages and batteries found in alternative wireless technologies. The resulting systems allow behavioural studies without motion constraints and enable experiments in a range of environments and contexts, such as social interactions. However, these devices are purely passive in their electronic design, thereby precluding any form of active control or programmability; independent operation of multiple devices, or of multiple active components in a single device, is, in particular, impossible. Here we report optoelectronic systems that, through developments in integrated circuit and antenna design, provide low-power operation, and position- and angle-independent wireless power harvesting, with full user-programmability over individual devices and collections of them. Furthermore, these integrated platforms have sizes and weights that are not significantly larger than those of previous, passive systems. Our results qualitatively expand options in output stabilization, intensity control and multimodal operation, with broad potential applications in neuroscience research and, in particular, the precise dissection of neural circuit function during unconstrained behavioural studies.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCenter for Bio-Integrated Electronics at Northwestern University; Cancer Center Support Grant from the National Cancer Institute [P30 CA060553]; National Natural Science Foundation of China [11402134]; National Science Foundation [1400169, 1534120, 1635443]en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUPen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/s41928-018-0175-0en_US
dc.rights© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Limited 2018.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.titleFully implantable optoelectronic systems for battery-free, multimodal operation in neuroscience researchen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Biomed Engn, Biosci Res Labsen_US
dc.identifier.journalNATURE ELECTRONICSen_US
dc.description.note6 month embargo; published 13 December 2018en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.journaltitleNature Electronics
dc.source.volume1
dc.source.issue12
dc.source.beginpage652
dc.source.endpage660


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