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dc.contributor.authorSo, Lisa Y
dc.contributor.authorMunger, Stephanie J
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Julie E
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-11T18:05:53Z
dc.date.available2019-03-11T18:05:53Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-15
dc.identifier.citationSo, L. Y., Munger, S. J., & Miller, J. E. (2019). Social context-dependent singing alters molecular markers of dopaminergic and glutamatergic signaling in finch basal ganglia Area X. Behavioural brain research, 360, 103-112.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1872-7549
dc.identifier.pmid30521933
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bbr.2018.12.004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/631814
dc.description.abstractDopamine (DA) is an important neuromodulator of motor control across species. In zebra finches, DA levels vary in song nucleus Area X depending upon social context. DA levels are high and song output is less variable when a male finch sings to a female (female directed, FD) compared to when he is singing by himself (undirected, UD). DA modulates glutamatergic input onto cortico-striatal synapses in Area X via N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and DA receptor mechanisms, but the relationship to UD vs. FD song output is unclear. Here, we investigate the expression of molecular markers of dopaminergic and glutamatergic synaptic transmission (tyrosine hydroxylase - TH, alpha-synuclein - α-syn) and plasticity (NMDA 2B receptor - GRIN2B) following singing (UD vs. FD) and non-singing states to understand the molecular mechanisms driving differences in song output. We identified relationships between protein levels for these biomarkers in Area X based on singing state and the amount of song, measured as the number of motifs and time spent singing. UD song amount drove increases in TH, α-syn, and NMDA 2B receptor protein levels. By contrast, the amount of FD song did not alter TH and NMDA 2B receptor expression. Levels of α-syn showed differential expression patterns based on UD vs. FD song, consistent with its role in modulating synaptic transmission. We propose a molecular pathway model to explain how social context and amount of song are important drivers of molecular changes required for synaptic transmission and plasticity.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherELSEVIER SCIENCE BVen_US
dc.rights© 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.subjectBasal gangliaen_US
dc.subjectDopamineen_US
dc.subjectGlutamateen_US
dc.subjectSongbirden_US
dc.subjectZebra finchen_US
dc.titleSocial context-dependent singing alters molecular markers of dopaminergic and glutamatergic signaling in finch basal ganglia Area Xen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Program Neuroscien_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Neuroscien_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Speech Language & Hearing Scien_US
dc.identifier.journalBEHAVIOURAL BRAIN RESEARCHen_US
dc.description.note18 month embargo; available online 3 December 2018.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.journaltitleBehavioural brain research


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