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dc.contributor.authorVersace, Francesco
dc.contributor.authorFrank, David W
dc.contributor.authorStevens, Elise M
dc.contributor.authorDeweese, Menton M
dc.contributor.authorGuindani, Michele
dc.contributor.authorSchembre, Susan M
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-22T17:50:27Z
dc.date.available2019-03-22T17:50:27Z
dc.date.issued2019-04-01
dc.identifier.citationVersace, F., Frank, D. W., Stevens, E. M., Deweese, M. M., Guindani, M., & Schembre, S. M. (2018). The reality of “food porn”: Larger brain responses to food‐related cues than to erotic images predict cue‐induced eating. Psychophysiology, e13309.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1540-5958
dc.identifier.pmid30556253
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/psyp.13309
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/631962
dc.description.abstractWhile some individuals can defy the lure of temptation, many others find appetizing food irresistible. The goal of this study was to investigate the neuropsychological mechanisms that increase individuals' vulnerability to cue-induced eating. Using ERPs, a direct measure of brain activity, we showed that individuals with larger late positive potentials in response to food-related cues than to erotic images are more susceptible to cue-induced eating and, in the presence of a palatable food option, eat more than twice as much as individuals with the opposite brain reactivity profile. By highlighting the presence of individual brain reactivity profiles associated with susceptibility to cue-induced eating, these findings contribute to the understanding of the neurobiological basis of vulnerability to obesity.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWILEYen_US
dc.rightsThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2018 The Authors. Psychophysiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Psychophysiological Researchen_US
dc.subjectERPsen_US
dc.subjectcue reactivityen_US
dc.subjectendophenotypesen_US
dc.subjectincentive salienceen_US
dc.subjectlate positive potential (LPP)en_US
dc.subjectsign trackingen_US
dc.titleThe reality of "food porn": Larger brain responses to food-related cues than to erotic images predict cue-induced eatingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Family & Community Med, Coll Med Tucsonen_US
dc.identifier.journalPSYCHOPHYSIOLOGYen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access articleen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitlePsychophysiology
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-22T17:50:27Z


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