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dc.contributor.authorVadiei, Nina
dc.contributor.authorBhattacharjee, Sandipan
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-25T22:08:17Z
dc.date.available2019-03-25T22:08:17Z
dc.date.issued2019-02-01
dc.identifier.citationVadiei, N. & Bhattacharjee, S. Int Urol Nephrol (2019) 51: 303. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11255-018-2034-3en_US
dc.identifier.issn1573-2584
dc.identifier.pmid30515735
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11255-018-2034-3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/631982
dc.description.abstractOne in five adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the United States (US) suffers from depression. Comorbid depression in adults with CKD is associated with higher morbidity and mortality. This study used US national survey data to examine patterns and predictors of depression treatment among adults with non-dialysis-dependent CKD in the US. A retrospective, cross-sectional study was conducted using 2014-2015 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) data. The final study sample consisted of visits by 9.02 million adults (unweighted n = 262; age ≥ 18 years) with CKD and depression in the US. Depression treatment was defined as antidepressant use with or without psychotherapy. To identify predictors of depression treatment, multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted adjusting for predisposing, enabling, and need factors. Approximately half of adults with CKD and depression received depression treatment. Primary care was the main setting of treatment, and the most commonly prescribed antidepressant class was selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Adults being seen for treatment of a chronic problem were 3.2 times more likely to receive depression treatment (OR 3.20; 95% CI 1.38-7.21). In addition, there was a 9% higher likelihood of receiving depression treatment for each unit increase in total number of medications (OR 1.09; 95% CI 1.01-1.19). Finally, adults receiving care in the South were 63% less likely to receive depression treatment (OR 0.37; 95% CI 0.15-0.89). Depression treatment was recorded in approximately half of US ambulatory care visits involving adults with CKD and depression from 2014 to 2015. Further research is warranted to determine how to appropriately manage treatment of depression in adults with CKD.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSPRINGERen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11255-018-2034-3en_US
dc.rights© Springer Nature B.V. 2018en_US
dc.subjectAdultsen_US
dc.subjectAmbulatory care settingsen_US
dc.subjectAntidepressantsen_US
dc.subjectChronic kidney diseaseen_US
dc.subjectDepressionen_US
dc.titlePatterns and predictors of depression treatment among adults with chronic kidney disease and depression in ambulatory care settings in the United Statesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Pharm, Dept Pharm Practice & Scien_US
dc.identifier.journalINTERNATIONAL UROLOGY AND NEPHROLOGYen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; published online: 4 December 2018en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.journaltitleInternational urology and nephrology


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