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dc.contributor.authorNettersheim, Johanna*
dc.contributor.authorGerlach, Gabriele*
dc.contributor.authorHerpertz, Stephan*
dc.contributor.authorAbed, Riadh*
dc.contributor.authorFigueredo, Aurelio J*
dc.contributor.authorBrüne, Martin*
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-29T20:53:12Z
dc.date.available2019-03-29T20:53:12Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-31
dc.identifier.citationNettersheim J, Gerlach G, Herpertz S, Abed R, Figueredo AJ and Brüne M (2018) Evolutionary Psychology of Eating Disorders: An Explorative Study in Patients With Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa. Front. Psychol. 9:2122. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.02122en_US
dc.identifier.issn1664-1078
dc.identifier.pmid30429818
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyg.2018.02122
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/632001
dc.description.abstractPrior research on non-clinical samples has lent support to the sexual competition hypothesis for eating disorders (SCH) where the drive for thinness can be seen as an originally adaptive strategy for women to preserve a nubile female shape, which, when driven to an extreme, may cause eating disorders. Restrictive versus impulsive eating behavior may also be relevant for individual differences in allocation of resources to either mating effort or somatic growth, reflected in an evolutionary concept called "Life History Theory" (LHT). In this study, we aimed to test the SCH and predictions from LHT in female patients with clinically manifest eating disorders. Accordingly, 20 women diagnosed with anorexia nervosa (AN), 20 with bulimia nervosa (BN), and 29 age-matched controls completed a package of questionnaires comprising measures for behavioral features and attitudes related to eating behavior, intrasexual competition, life history strategy, executive functioning and mating effort. In line with predictions, we found that relatively faster life history strategies were associated with poorer executive functioning, lower perceived own mate value, greater intrasexual competition for mates but not for status, and, in part, with greater disordered eating behavior. Comparisons between AN and BN revealed that individuals with BN tended to pursue a "fast" life history strategy, whereas people with AN were more similar to controls in pursuing a "slow" life history strategy. Moreover, intrasexual competition for mates was significantly predicted by the severity of disordered eating behavior. Together, our findings lend partial support to the SCH for eating disorders. We discuss the implications and limitations of our study findings.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFRONTIERS MEDIA SAen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.02122/fullen_US
dc.rights© 2018 Nettersheim, Gerlach, Herpertz, Abed, Figueredo and Brüne. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).en_US
dc.subjectanorexia nervosaen_US
dc.subjectbulimiaen_US
dc.subjecteating disordersen_US
dc.subjectexecutive functioningen_US
dc.subjectintrasexual competitionen_US
dc.subjectlife history strategyen_US
dc.subjectmate valueen_US
dc.titleEvolutionary Psychology of Eating Disorders: An Explorative Study in Patients With Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Psychol, Coll Sci, Sch Mind Brain & Behaven_US
dc.identifier.journalFRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGYen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access journal.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleFrontiers in psychology
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-29T20:53:12Z


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