Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorZohdy, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorBisanzio, Donal
dc.contributor.authorTecot, Stacey
dc.contributor.authorWright, Patricia C.
dc.contributor.authorJernvall, Jukka
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-17T21:21:54Z
dc.date.available2019-04-17T21:21:54Z
dc.date.issued2017-10
dc.identifier.citationZohdy, S., Bisanzio, D., Tecot, S., Wright, P. C., & Jernvall, J. (2017). Aggression and hormones are associated with heterogeneity in parasitism and parasite dynamics in the brown mouse lemur. Animal Behaviour, 132, 109-119.en_US
dc.identifier.issn00033472
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.08.002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/632070
dc.description.abstractAnimal behaviours, like aggression, can directly affect host health by influencing exposure to parasites. Aggressive individuals may experience an increase in agonistic interactions and contact rates with conspecifics, which might increase their probability of acquiring parasites. However, aggression is not the only factor that shapes parasitism; proximate mechanisms like hormone-modulated immunosuppression can also have broad impacts. Here, we hypothesized that high levels of aggression, cortisol and testosterone would be positively associated with parasitism and that aggressive individuals would play a larger role spreading parasites to conspecifics than would docile individuals. We measured aggression using the level of aggressive response to human handling during capture. Our aim was to examine associations between aggression and hormones (cortisol and testosterone) on variation in endo-and ectoparasitism in a population of wild mouse lemurs (Microcebus rufus) over a 3-year period. By tracking the movement of lice (directly transmitted parasites) in the population, we also examined the effect of host aggression on population-wide parasite dynamics. We show that animals with high testosterone and cortisol were more likely to exhibit aggressive behaviours, and cortisol was associated with significantly higher ectoparasite infestations. Aggressive individuals were significantly more infested by lice, and also donated significantly more lice to conspecifics in the population. Taken together, our results offer insight into the individual and population health costs of aggression, and empirical support of a trade-off between aggression and ectoparasitism, which may have driven the evolution of aggression and interactions with conspecifics. (C) 2017 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTDen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0003347217302518en_US
dc.rights© 2017 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectbehaviouren_US
dc.subjectcortisolen_US
dc.subjectliceen_US
dc.subjectMadagascaren_US
dc.subjectprimateen_US
dc.subjecttestosteroneen_US
dc.titleAggression and hormones are associated with heterogeneity in parasitism and parasite dynamics in the brown mouse lemuren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Anthropolen_US
dc.identifier.journalANIMAL BEHAVIOURen_US
dc.description.note24 month embargo; published online: 4 September 2017en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.journaltitleAnimal Behaviour
dc.source.volume132
dc.source.beginpage109
dc.source.endpage119


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
ANBEH-Final_revision_copy.pdf
Size:
1.918Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Final Accepted Manuscript

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record