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dc.contributor.authorBauer, Margaret R
dc.contributor.authorWiley, Joshua F
dc.contributor.authorWeihs, Karen L
dc.contributor.authorStanton, Annette L
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-17T22:57:37Z
dc.date.available2019-04-17T22:57:37Z
dc.date.issued2017-09-01
dc.identifier.citationBauer, M. R., Wiley, J. F., Weihs, K. L. and Stanton, A. L. (2017), Stuck in the spin cycle: Avoidance and intrusions following breast cancer diagnosis. Br J Health Psychol, 22: 609-626. doi:10.1111/bjhp.12252en_US
dc.identifier.issn2044-8287
dc.identifier.pmid28628740
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/bjhp.12252
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/632074
dc.description.abstractObjectives. Theories and research regarding cognitive and emotional processing during the experience of profound stressors suggest that the presence of intrusive thoughts and feelings predicts greater use of avoidance and that the use of avoidance paradoxically predicts more intrusions. However, empirical investigations of their purported bidirectional relationship are limited. Design. This study presents a longitudinal investigation of the reciprocal relationship between intrusions and avoidance coping over a 6-month period in the year following breast cancer diagnosis. Methods. Breast cancer patients (N = 460) completed measures of cancer-related intrusions and avoidance at study entry, 3 months, and 6 months later (i.e., an average of 2, 5, and 8 months after diagnosis, respectively). Results. Cross-lagged panel analyses revealed that intrusive thoughts, feelings, and images at study entry predicted greater avoidance 3 months later, and avoidance coping at study entry predicted intrusions 3 months later, controlling for the stability of intrusions and avoidance as well as time since diagnosis. Findings were not statistically significant for avoidance predicting intrusions, or vice versa, between the 3-month and the 6-month assessment period, during which they declined. Conclusions. These findings provide empirical support for the theoretical contention that avoidance and intrusive thoughts and emotions reciprocally influence one another following stressful events. Additionally, in the months shortly after breast cancer diagnosis, intrusions and avoidance are positively related. However, the relationships attenuate over time, which could indicate resolved cognitive and emotional processing of the cancer experience.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNIH/NCI [1R01 CA133081]; NCI - University of Arizona Cancer Center Support Grant [P30CA023074]; National Science Foundation [DGE-1144087]; Breast Cancer Research Foundation [BCRF-16-151]en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWILEYen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bjhp.12252en_US
dc.rights© 2017 The British Psychological Society.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectavoidanceen_US
dc.subjectcanceren_US
dc.subjectcognitive processingen_US
dc.subjectcopingen_US
dc.subjectintrusive thoughtsen_US
dc.titleStuck in the spin cycle: Avoidance and intrusions following breast cancer diagnosisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Psychiaten_US
dc.identifier.journalBRITISH JOURNAL OF HEALTH PSYCHOLOGYen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; published online: 19 June 2017en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.journaltitleBritish journal of health psychology
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-19T00:00:00Z


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