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dc.contributor.authorChaudhary, Sachin
dc.contributor.authorMeinke, Laura
dc.contributor.authorAteeli, Huthayfa
dc.contributor.authorKnox, Kenneth S.
dc.contributor.authorRaz, Yuval
dc.contributor.authorAmpel, Neil M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-01T23:31:43Z
dc.date.available2019-05-01T23:31:43Z
dc.date.issued2017-08
dc.identifier.citationChaudhary, S, Meinke, L, Ateeli, H, Knox, KS, Raz, Y, Ampel, NM. Coccidioidomycosis among persons undergoing lung transplantation in the coccidioidal endemic region. Transpl Infect Dis. 2017; 19:e12713. https://doi.org/10.1111/tid.12713en_US
dc.identifier.issn13982273
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/tid.12713
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/632175
dc.description.abstractBackground Coccidioidomycosis, an endemic fungal infection, is more likely to be symptomatic and severe among those receiving allogeneic transplants. While several case series have been published for various transplanted organs, none has described the incidence and outcomes in those receiving lung transplants within the coccidioidal endemic region. Methods Patients receiving a heart-lung, single-lung, or bilateral-lung transplantation at the University of Arizona between 1985 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Results Coccidioidomycosis occurred post transplantation in 11 (5.8%) of 189 patients. All but one patient was diagnosed with pulmonary coccidioidomycosis and only one had a history of prior coccidioidomycosis. Two patients received transplants from donors found to have coccidioidomycosis at the time of transplantation and one death was directly attributed to coccidioidomycosis. The risk of developing active coccidioidomycosis was significantly higher if the patient did not receive some type of antifungal therapy post transplantation (P<.001). Conclusion Within the coccidioidal endemic region, post-transplantation coccidioidomycosis was a definable risk among lung transplant recipients. Use of antifungals appeared to reduce this incidence of disease. Almost all cases resulted in pulmonary disease, suggesting that the lung is the primary site of infection.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWILEYen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/tid.2017.19.issue-4en_US
dc.rights© 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltden_US
dc.subjectcoccidioidomycosisen_US
dc.subjectfungal infectionsen_US
dc.subjectlungen_US
dc.subjecttransplantationen_US
dc.titleCoccidioidomycosis among persons undergoing lung transplantation in the coccidioidal endemic regionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Med, Div Pulm, Dept Meden_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Med, Div Infect Dis, Dept Meden_US
dc.identifier.journalTRANSPLANT INFECTIOUS DISEASEen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; published online: 28 April 2017en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.journaltitleTransplant Infectious Disease
dc.source.volume19
dc.source.issue4
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-28T00:00:00Z


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