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dc.contributor.advisorLivingston, Margaret
dc.contributor.authorMcGuire, Grace
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-04T21:16:48Z
dc.date.available2019-05-04T21:16:48Z
dc.date.issued2019-04
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/632206
dc.descriptionSustainable Built Environments Senior Capstone Projecten_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examines one plant species in order to reveal the historical, biological, and social attachments the plant brings to the public and private landscapes in the city of Tucson, Arizona. The life cycle history, cultural attachment, and biological characteristics of the Agave genus are evaluated in terms the relationship between a native, Sonoran Desert adapted species and its use within the urban matrix. The succulent, rosette form is a characteristic that makes the agave species distinct from all other desert plants. Six particular agave species are mentioned within this writing, and are connected to the Tucson area’s cultural history, and current application of agave as a landscaping material. Agaves symbolize a rich history of human utilization and reliance, especially in the cultures of central/northern Mexico. As the industry within the U.S. for mescal products grows, agave on the landscape become distinctly agriculture based. The practices of wild harvesting agave for distillation and not allowing cultivated agaves to bloom impacts the ecosystem functions of northern Sonora, Mexico, and the southwestern United States, and severely limits the populations of wild agaves. It is estimated that in the coming years it will be almost impossible to find certain populations of wild agaves.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectBuilt Environmenten_US
dc.subjectSustainabilityen_US
dc.subjectAgaves -- Adaptation.en_US
dc.subjectagaveen_US
dc.subjectcultural landscapeen_US
dc.subjectlandscape ecologyen_US
dc.titleBLOOMING & DYING: AGAVE WITHIN TUCSON’S BUILT ENVIRONMENTen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeposteren_US
dc.typethesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSustainable Built Environmentsen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Sustainable Built Environments collection. For more information, contact http://sbe.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorSmith, Steve
dc.contributor.instructorIuliano, Joey
refterms.dateFOA2019-05-04T21:16:49Z


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