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dc.contributor.authorKurgat, Elkana K
dc.contributor.authorSexton, Jonathan D
dc.contributor.authorGaravito, Fernanda
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, Adriana
dc.contributor.authorContreras, R David
dc.contributor.authorGerba, Charles P
dc.contributor.authorLeslie, Rachel A
dc.contributor.authorEdmonds-Wilson, Sarah L
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, Kelly A
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-03T19:21:35Z
dc.date.available2019-06-03T19:21:35Z
dc.date.issued2019-04-01
dc.identifier.citationKurgat, E. K., Sexton, J. D., Garavito, F., Reynolds, A., Contreras, R. D., Gerba, C. P., ... & Reynolds, K. A. (2019). Impact of a hygiene intervention on virus spread in an office building. International journal of hygiene and environmental health.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1618-131X
dc.identifier.pmid30655228
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijheh.2019.01.001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/632456
dc.description.abstractViral illnesses have a significant direct and indirect impact on the workplace that burdens employers with increased healthcare costs, low productivity, and absenteeism. Workers' direct contact with each other and contaminated surfaces contributes to the spread of viruses at work. This study quantifies the impact of an office wellness intervention (OWI) to reduce viral load in the workplace. The OWI includes the use of a spray disinfectant on high-touch surfaces and providing workers with alcohol-based hand sanitizer gel and hand sanitizing wipes along with user instructions. Viral transmission was monitored by applying an MS2 phage tracer to a door handle and the hand of a single volunteer participant. At the same time, a placebo inoculum was applied to the hands of four additional volunteers. The purpose was to evaluate the concentration of viruses on workers' hands and office surfaces before and after the OWI. Results showed that the OWI significantly reduced viable phage concentrations per surface area on participants' hands, shared fomites, and personal fomites (p = 0.0001) with an 85.4% average reduction. Reduction of virus concentrations on hands and fomites is expected to subsequently minimize the risk of infections from common enteric and respiratory pathogens. The surfaces identified as most contaminated were the refrigerator, drawer handles and sink faucets in the break room, along with pushbar on the main exit of the building, and the soap dispensers in the women's restroom. A comparison of contamination in different locations within the office showed that the break room and women's restrooms were the sites with the highest tracer counts. Results of this study can be used to inform quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) models aimed at defining the relationship between surface contamination, pathogen exposure and the probability of disease that contributes to high healthcare costs, absenteeism, presenteeism, and loss of productivity in the workplace.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipGOJO Industries, Inc.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherELSEVIER GMBHen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1438463918305911?via%3Dihuben_US
dc.rightsPublished by Elsevier GmbH. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license.en_US
dc.subjectAbsenteeismen_US
dc.subjectMS2 bacteriophage traceren_US
dc.subjectOffice wellness interventions (OWIs)en_US
dc.subjectPresenteeismen_US
dc.subjectViral infectionsen_US
dc.subjectWorkplace healthen_US
dc.titleImpact of a hygiene intervention on virus spread in an office buildingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Environm Exposure Sci & Risk Assessment Ctr, Mel & Enid Zuckerman Coll Publ Hlthen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Soil Water & Environm Scien_US
dc.identifier.journalINTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HYGIENE AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTHen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access article.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleInternational journal of hygiene and environmental health
refterms.dateFOA2019-06-03T19:21:35Z


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