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dc.contributor.advisorPerez, Linda
dc.contributor.authorPendleton, Shane
dc.creatorPendleton, Shane
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-13T03:57:27Z
dc.date.available2019-06-13T03:57:27Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/632816
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this thesis is to address the significance of chronic low back pain in the United States, as well as the surge in opioid use. In the United States, opioids have become the most commonly prescribed class of drug. Because of their addictive nature, their propensity to cause physical dependence, the body’s inevitable natural tolerance, and the risk of overdose, opioids cannot be considered an effective treatment for chronic back pain management. Increasing abdominal muscle strength has been shown to significantly reduce lower back pain. Therefore, this paper will focus on interventions including yoga, Pilates, and core stabilization programs. This paper will propose an evidence-based algorithm for the implementation of movement therapies. Primary care providers will utilize a stoplight visual to help the patient determine appropriate therapy to be implemented based on pain. The patient would rate their pain each day and follow the protocol for the corresponding category. Different interventions would be used based on three different categories: green (pain score: 0-3), yellow (pain score: 4-7), and red (pain score: 8-10). The author proposes that this algorithm will result in decreases in pain, use of opioid medications, and cost of pain management for chronic low back pain.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
dc.titleTreating Chronic Low Back Pain Without Opioids
dc.typetext
dc.typeElectronic Thesis
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizona
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors College
thesis.degree.disciplineNursing
thesis.degree.nameB.S.
refterms.dateFOA2019-06-13T03:57:27Z


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