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dc.contributor.authorBourassa, Kyle J.
dc.contributor.authorRuiz, John M.
dc.contributor.authorSbarra, David A.
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-13T20:36:39Z
dc.date.available2019-06-13T20:36:39Z
dc.date.issued2019-05
dc.identifier.citationBourassa, KJ, Ruiz, JM, Sbarra, DA. The impact of physical proximity and attachment working models on cardiovascular reactivity: Comparing mental activation and romantic partner presence. Psychophysiology. 2019; 56:e13324. https://doi.org/10.1111/psyp.13324en_US
dc.identifier.issn0048-5772
dc.identifier.issn1469-8986
dc.identifier.pmid30613999
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/psyp.2019.56.issue-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/632890
dc.description.abstractClose relationships, especially high-quality romantic relationships, are consistently associated with positive physical health outcomes. Attenuated cardiovascular reactivity is one physiological mechanism implicated in explaining these effects. Drawing on attachment and social baseline theories, this experimental study evaluated two potential affiliative cues as mechanisms through which romantic relationships may attenuate cardiovascular reactivity to a laboratory-based stressor. Prior to a cold pressor task, 102 participants were randomly assigned to either have their partner physically present, call upon a mental representation of their partner, or think about their day during the stressor. Consistent with our preregistered hypotheses, participants in both the partner present and mental activation conditions had significantly lower blood pressure (BP) reactivity during the cold pressor task compared to control participants for both systolic (d = -0.54) and diastolic BP (d = -0.53), but no significant differences emerged for heart rate or heart rate variability. Although participants in the partner present and mental activation conditions had similar BP reactivity to the cold pressor task, those in the partner present condition reported significantly less pain as a result of the task. The difference in BP reactivity by condition was moderatedBP reactivity was greater for people with lower self-reported relationship satisfaction. The results suggest that accessing the mental representation of a romantic partner and a partner's presence each buffer against exaggerated acute stress responses to a similar degree. Romantic relationships are associated with positive physical health, and cardiovascular reactivity (CVR) is one mechanism that may explain these effects. The current study provided evidence that having a partner present or imagining a partner's support resulted in significantly lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure compared to people thinking about their day. Results suggest that accessing the mental representation of a romantic partner and a partner's presence reduces CVR to stressful tasks in a similar way.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Arizona Graduate and Professional Student Council [RSRCH-205FY'18]en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWILEYen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/14698986/56/5en_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/psyp.13324en_US
dc.rights© 2019 Society for Psychophysiological Research.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectattachment theoryen_US
dc.subjectblood pressureen_US
dc.subjectcardiovascular reactivityen_US
dc.subjectheart rateen_US
dc.subjectheart rate variabilityen_US
dc.subjectromantic relationshipsen_US
dc.subjectsocial baseline theoryen_US
dc.titleThe impact of physical proximity and attachment working models on cardiovascular reactivity: Comparing mental activation and romantic partner presenceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Psycholen_US
dc.identifier.journalPSYCHOPHYSIOLOGYen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; published online: 4 January 2019en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.journaltitlePsychophysiology
dc.source.volume56
dc.source.issue5


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