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dc.contributor.authorNwaila, G. T.
dc.contributor.authorManzi, M. S. D.
dc.contributor.authorKirk, J.
dc.contributor.authorMaselela, H. K.
dc.contributor.authorDurrheim, R. J.
dc.contributor.authorRose, D. H.
dc.contributor.authorNwaila, P. C.
dc.contributor.authorBam, L. C.
dc.contributor.authorKhumalo, T.
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-27T17:34:29Z
dc.date.available2019-06-27T17:34:29Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-01
dc.identifier.citationG. T. Nwaila, M. S. D. Manzi, J. Kirk, H. K. Maselela, R. J. Durrheim, D. H. Rose, P. C. Nwaila, L. C. Bam, and T. Khumalo, "Recycling of Paleoplacer Gold through Mechanical and Postdepositional Mobilization in the Neoarchean Black Reef Formation, South Africa," The Journal of Geology 127, no. 2 (March 2019): 137-166. https://doi.org/10.1086/701678en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-1376
dc.identifier.issn1537-5269
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/701678
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/633050
dc.description.abstractThe source of gold in the ca. 2.66 Ga Black Reef Formation (BRF) has been investigated and constrained through petrographic, mineralogical, geochemical, and high-resolution three-dimensional reflection seismic data combined with drill core and underground geological mapping. The BRF is a strong seismic marker and consists of carbonaceous shale, quartz arenite, and conglomerate. Gold grade in the BRF is primarily controlled by the nature of the host conglomerates. Most of the gold in the BRF conglomerate occurs in native form, and its morphology is highly heterogeneous. Gold was initially introduced through mechanical recycling of underlying Witwatersrand reefs, followed by short-range (millimeter- to centimeter-scale) postdepositional alteration/remobilization associated with the Bushveld Complex and the Vredefort meteorite impact. Although the BRF was subjected to high postdepositional fluid circulation facilitated by high fracture density, the volume of dissolved gold was probably too small to form a large gold deposit, except in areas around the Black Reef/Witwatersrand reefs subcrop positions. Findings from this study demonstrate the importance of both sedimentological controls and impact-related structures in the formation of paleoplacer gold deposits during Neoarchean times.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCIMERA (Centre of Excellence for Integrated Mineral and Energy Resource Analysis); National Research Foundation (South Africa); Sibanye Stillwater; Schlumburgeren_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUNIV CHICAGO PRESSen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/701678en_US
dc.rights© 2019 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.titleRecycling of Paleoplacer Gold through Mechanical and Postdepositional Mobilization in the Neoarchean Black Reef Formation, South Africaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Geoscien_US
dc.identifier.journalJOURNAL OF GEOLOGYen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; published online: 28 January 2019en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleThe Journal of Geology
dc.source.volume127
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage137
dc.source.endpage166


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