Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorButler, Emily
dc.contributor.authorFonseca, Ana
dc.creatorFonseca, Ana
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-28T04:01:16Z
dc.date.available2019-06-28T04:01:16Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/633121
dc.description.abstractInterracial heterosexual romantic relationships have increased in the U.S. population. Studies on interracial romantic relationships have reported higher rates of conflict, tension, stress, dissatisfaction, and long-term instability. Most studies have studied interracial couples using categorical responses of race and ethnicity yet, this limits theoretical understanding to the characteristics that make-up high quality relationships. This study represents the first attempt to explore how similarities and differences between intercultural romantic partners (i.e., partners coming from different racial, ethnic, language, and/or religious backgrounds) in culturally-based emotional attitudes and relationship goals predict effective or ineffective interpersonal emotional processes, and in turn relationship quality by testing a newly developed model called the Culturally-Based Romantic Relationship (CBR2). To test this model, 40 intercultural romantic couples were recruited from the Southwestern region of the U.S. and were asked to complete a couple’s lab session. Couples completed four-video recorded emotional conversations while their physiological responses were captured. Overall, the results provide partial support for certain paths in the CBR2 model. Theoretical models of this nature are highly essential because they can impact policy and programs that are developed for various groups of people.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction, presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
dc.subjectCouples
dc.subjectCulture
dc.subjectEmotions
dc.subjectRegulation
dc.subjectRelationship Quality
dc.titleLove is Universal but Still Culturally Specific: A Model for Understanding Healthy Relationship Functioning in Intercultural Romantic Couples
dc.typetext
dc.typeElectronic Dissertation
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizona
thesis.degree.leveldoctoral
dc.contributor.committeememberKoyama, Jill
dc.contributor.committeememberMehl, Matthias
dc.contributor.committeememberCurran, Melissa
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate College
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily & Consumer Sciences
thesis.degree.namePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2019-06-28T04:01:16Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_etd_16956_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
3.360Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record