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dc.contributor.advisorCalvert, Paul
dc.contributor.authorTanooryan, Mansooreh
dc.creatorTanooryan, Mansooreh
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-06T02:20:22Z
dc.date.available2019-07-06T02:20:22Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/633316
dc.description.abstractSeveral types of alginate have been developed, but none of them alone are able to interact with mammalian cells. Alginate does not provide anchorage points that are essential for cell growth and proliferation. As this hydrogel meets many requirements for tissue engineering, modification of alginate was proposed in order to stimulate cell adhesion. After recognition of RGD binding site in ECM proteins, synthetic RGD peptides were coupled with alginate via aqueous carbodiimide chemistry. I applied this conjugation and optimized it in terms of various parameters of the coupling reaction. Mouse skeletal Myoblasts were cultured on the surface of the modified alginate. They were attached, spread and differentiated to form myotubes. This showed that an RGD containing peptide has the ability to mimic ECM molecule binding sites and stimulate adhesion to materials that are otherwise unable to interact with cells. I also demonstrated that RGD density enhanced proliferation and spreading. Increasing crosslinker density made stiffer gels and controlled cell differentiation. Including free Ca2+ improved swelling properties of alginate gel, enforced cell attachment and enhanced conversion of myoblasts to myotubes.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction, presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
dc.titleAdhesion of Myoblasts to RGD-Alginate
dc.typetext
dc.typeReport-Reproduction (electronic)
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizona
thesis.degree.levelmasters
dc.contributor.committeemember
thesis.degree.disciplineBiomedical Engineering
thesis.degree.nameM.S.
dc.description.noteDigitized from a paper copy provided by the Physiological Sciences Graduate Interdisciplinary Program.
refterms.dateFOA2019-07-06T02:20:22Z


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