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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Ezra E
dc.contributor.authorAllen, John J B
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-08T21:47:18Z
dc.date.available2019-07-08T21:47:18Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-01
dc.identifier.citationSmith, E., & Allen, J. (2019). Theta-Band Functional Connectivity and Single-Trial Cognitive Control in Sports-Related Concussion: Demonstration of Proof-of-Concept for a Potential Biomarker of Concussion. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 25(3), 314-323. doi:10.1017/S135561771800108Xen_US
dc.identifier.issn1469-7661
dc.identifier.pmid30681045
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S135561771800108X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/633340
dc.description.abstractObjectives: This report examined theta-band neurodynamics for potential biomarkers of brain health in athletes with concussion. Methods: Participants included college-age contact/collision athletes with (N=24) and without a history of concussion (N=16) in Study 1. Study 2 (N=10) examined changes over time in contact/collision athletes. There were two primary dependent variables: (1) theta-band phase-synchronization (e.g., functional connectivity) between medial and right-lateral electrodes; and (2) the within-subject correlation between synchronization strength on error trials and post-error reaction time (i.e., operationalization of cognitive control). Results: Head injury history was inversely related with medial-lateral connectivity. Head injury was also related to declines in a neurobehavioral measure of cognitive control (i.e., the single-trial relationship between connectivity and post-error slowing). Conclusions: Results align with a theory of connectivity-mediated cognitive control. Mild injuries undetectable by behavioral measures may still be apparent on direct measures of neural functioning. This report demonstrates that connectivity and cognitive control measures may be useful for tracking recovery from concussion. Theoretically relevant neuroscientific findings in healthy adults may have applications in patient populations, especially with regard to monitoring brain health. (JINS 2019, 25, 314-323)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA); Graduate and Professional Student Council of the University of Arizonaen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESSen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-the-international-neuropsychological-society/article/thetaband-functional-connectivity-and-singletrial-cognitive-control-in-sportsrelated-concussion-demonstration-of-proofofconcept-for-a-potential-biomarker-of-concussion/C4384F7D839009573B1DC5ADF046CAACen_US
dc.rights© The International Neuropsychological Society 2019en_US
dc.subjectAthletesen_US
dc.subjectBiomarkersen_US
dc.subjectCognitive functionen_US
dc.subjectEEGen_US
dc.subjectHead injuriesen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.titleTheta-Band Functional Connectivity and Single-Trial Cognitive Control in Sports-Related Concussion: Demonstration of Proof-of-Concept for a Potential Biomarker of Concussionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Psycholen_US
dc.identifier.journalJOURNAL OF THE INTERNATIONAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL SOCIETYen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS
refterms.dateFOA2019-07-08T21:47:19Z


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