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dc.contributor.authorBaumann, Alysa
dc.creatorBaumann, Alysa
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-20T02:29:51Z
dc.date.available2019-07-20T02:29:51Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/633419
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
dc.description.abstractResearch has shown benefit for United States veterans with service dogs and emotional support animals. However, the literature is lacking in research on the beneficial effects and impact of therapy animals specifically on the disabled veteran population. This pilot study explored the effects of a single therapy dog on various aspects of mood, including depression and anxiety, in disabled veterans by incorporating five weeks of thirty-minute therapy sessions to a group of eight veterans. Although this was a small sample population, we concluded that five weeks of consecutive animal assisted therapy resulted in a general decrease in anxiety and depression, and an overall positive increase in mood as evidenced by Beck Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, and Trauma Symptom Inventory scores. Further large-scale studies will need to be conducted with a greater number of participants to help support the data in this study.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.subjectVeterans
dc.subjectMental Health
dc.subjectAnimal Assisted Therapy
dc.subject.meshMental Disorders
dc.subject.meshCommunity Preventative Medicine
dc.subject.meshPsychiatry
dc.titleDoes Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) have an effect on mood in United States Veterans?
dc.typetext
dc.typeElectronic Thesis
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2019 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
dc.contributor.mentorNelson, Erin
refterms.dateFOA2019-07-20T02:29:51Z


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