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dc.contributor.authorIrwin, John B.
dc.contributor.authorBaldwin, A. L.
dc.contributor.authorStenberg, Virgil, I
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-24T01:17:29Z
dc.date.available2019-07-24T01:17:29Z
dc.date.issued2019-06
dc.identifier.citationIrwin, J. B., Baldwin, A. L., & Stenberg, V. I. (2019). General theory of inflammation: patient self-administration of hydrocortisone safely achieves superior control of hydrocortisone-responding disorders by matching dosage with symptom intensity. Journal of Inflammation Research, 12, 161-166.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1178-7031
dc.identifier.doi10.2147/jir.s195165
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/633481
dc.description.abstractObjective: To determine if patient self-administration of hydrocortisone will safely achieve superior symptom control for all hydrocortisone-responding disorders as it does for Addison's disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: Two thousand four hundred and twenty-eight participants with hydrocortisone-responding disorders were brought to a minimum symptom state using daily administered hydrocortisone tablets in a 24-week, open study. Thereafter, participants used 5-day, low-dose hydrocortisone regimens to quench subsequent disorder exacerbations (flares) to maintain the minimum symptom state. Stressors such as emotional traumas, infections, allergies, and injuries were minimized to reduce disorder intensity, hydrocortisone consumption, and participant discomfort. Results: Two thousand fifteen participants, 601 with fibromyalgia, 579 with osteoarthritis, 246 with rheumatoid arthritis, 226 with undifferentiated arthritis, 75 with back pain, 51 with Parkinson's disease, 44 with polymyalgia rheumatica, 25 with neuropathy, 25 with chronic fatigue syndrome, 25 with dementia, 21 with migraine headache, 19 with multiple sclerosis, and 78 with other disorders completed the 24-week study to achieve a composite average symptom improvement of 76% with equal response rates. The participants averaged ingesting 12 mg of hydrocortisone per day. No significant adverse reactions were observed. Conclusions: Patient self-administration of hydrocortisone safely achieves superior symptom control for 38 hydrocortisone-responding disorders at equal rates and symptom improvements to confirm and amplify an earlier double-blind study finding on rheumatoid arthritis. These results are consistent with the body having an inflammation control system and chronic inflammation being a disorder unto itself with differing symptoms sets dependent on its location.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherDove Medical Press Ltden_US
dc.rights© 2019 Irwin et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms (https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php).en_US
dc.subjectgeneral theory of inflammationen_US
dc.subjectchronic inflammationen_US
dc.subjectinflammation control systemen_US
dc.subjectpainen_US
dc.subjectosteoarthritisen_US
dc.subjectfibromyalgiaen_US
dc.titleGeneral theory of inflammation: patient self-administration of hydrocortisone safely achieves superior control of hydrocortisone-responding disorders by matching dosage with symptom intensityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Med, Dept Physiolen_US
dc.identifier.journalJOURNAL OF INFLAMMATION RESEARCHen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access journalen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.volumeVolume 12
dc.source.beginpage161-166
refterms.dateFOA2019-07-24T01:17:30Z


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