Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorStensaker, Bjørn
dc.contributor.authorLee, Jenny J.
dc.contributor.authorRhoades, Gary
dc.contributor.authorGhosh, Sowmya
dc.contributor.authorCastiello-Gutiérrez, Santiago
dc.contributor.authorVance, Hillary
dc.contributor.authorÇalıkoğlu, Alper
dc.contributor.authorKramer, Vannessa
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Shuiyun
dc.contributor.authorMarei, Mahmoud Sayed
dc.contributor.authorO’Toole, Leslie
dc.contributor.authorPavlyutkin, Ivan
dc.contributor.authorPeel, Cassandra
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-25T21:41:47Z
dc.date.available2019-07-25T21:41:47Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationStensaker, B., Lee, J. J., Rhoades, G., Ghosh, S., Castiello-Gutiérrez, S., Vance, H., ... & O’Toole, L. (2018). Stratified university strategies: The shaping of institutional legitimacy in a global perspective. The Journal of Higher Education, 1-24.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-1546
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00221546.2018.1513306
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/633503
dc.description.abstractGlobalizing forces have both transformed the higher education sector and made it increasingly homogenous. Growing similarities among universities have been attributed to isomorphic pressures to ensure and/or enhance legitimacy by imitating higher education institutions that are perceived as successful internationally, particularly universities that are highly ranked globally (Cantwell & Kauppinen, 2014; DiMaggio and Powell, 1983). In this study, we compared the strategic plans of 78 high-ranked, low-ranked, and unranked universities in 33 countries in 9 regions of the world. In analyzing the plans of these 78 universities, the study explored patterns of similarity and difference in universities' strategic positioning according to Suchman's (1995) 3 types of legitimacy: cognitive, pragmatic, and moral. We found evidence of stratified university strategies in a global higher education landscape that varied by institutional status. In offering a corrective to neoinstitutional theory, we suggest that patterns of globalization are mediated by status-based differences in aspirational behavior (Riesman, 1958) and "old institutional" forces (Stinchcombe, 1997) that contribute to differently situated universities pursuing new paths in seeking to build external legitimacy.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTDen_US
dc.rights© 2019 The Ohio State Universityen_US
dc.subjectStrategic plansen_US
dc.subjectinstitutional theoryen_US
dc.subjectglobal rankingsen_US
dc.titleStratified University Strategies: The Shaping of Institutional Legitimacy in a Global Perspectiveen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1538-4640
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Ctr Study Higher Educen_US
dc.identifier.journalJOURNAL OF HIGHER EDUCATIONen_US
dc.description.note18 month embargo; published online: 13 Sep 2018en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.volume90
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpage539-562


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
JHE Stratified University ...
Size:
284.1Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Final Accepted Manuscript

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record