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dc.contributor.authorHammer, Michael
dc.contributor.authorPinilla, Paola
dc.contributor.authorKratter, Kaitlin M
dc.contributor.authorLin, Min-Kai
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-05T23:15:33Z
dc.date.available2019-08-05T23:15:33Z
dc.date.issued2019-01
dc.identifier.citationMichael Hammer, Paola Pinilla, Kaitlin M Kratter, Min-Kai Lin, Observational diagnostics of elongated planet-induced vortices with realistic planet formation time-scales, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Volume 482, Issue 3, January 2019, Pages 3609–3621, https://doi.org/10.1093/mnras/sty2946en_US
dc.identifier.issn0035-8711
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/mnras/sty2946
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/633683
dc.description.abstractGap-opening planets can generate dust-trapping vortices that may explain some of the latest discoveries of high-contrast crescent-shaped dust asymmetries in transition discs. While planet-induced vortices were previously thought to have concentrated shapes, recent computational work has shown that these features naturally become much more elongated in the gas when simulations account for the relatively long time-scale over which planets accrete their mass. In this work, we conduct two-fluid hydrodynamical simulations of vortices induced by slowly growing Jupiter-mass planets in discs with very low viscosity (alpha = 3 x 10(-5)). We simulate the dust dynamics for four particle sizes spanning 0.3 mm to 1 cm in order to produce synthetic ALMA images. In our simulations, we find that an elongated vortex still traps dust, but not directly at its centre. With a flatter pressure bump and disruptions from the planet's overlapping spiral density waves, the dust instead circulates around the vortex. This motion (1) typically carries the peak off-centre, (2) spreads the dust out over a wider azimuthal extent >= 180 degrees, (3) skews the azimuthal profile towards the front of the vortex, and (4) can also create double peaks in newly formed vortices. In particular, we expect that the most defining observational signature, a peak offset of more than 30 degrees, should be detectable > 30 per cent of the time in observations with a beam diameter of at most the planet's separation from its star.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNSF Graduate Research Fellowship [DGE 1143953]; NASA through Hubble Fellowship grant - Space Telescope Science Institute [HST-HF2-51380.001-A]; NASA [NAS 5-26555]; National Science Foundation [AST-1410174, 1228509]; Theoretical Institute for Advanced Research in Astrophysics (TIARA) based inAcademica Sinica Institute of Astronomy andAstrophysics (ASIAA); NASA Astrophysics Theory Program grant [NNX17AK59G]en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherOXFORD UNIV PRESSen_US
dc.rights© 2018 The Author(s) Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society.en_US
dc.subjecthydrodynamicsen_US
dc.subjectmethods: numericalen_US
dc.subjectprotoplanetary discsen_US
dc.titleObservational diagnostics of elongated planet-induced vortices with realistic planet formation time-scalesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Steward Observen_US
dc.identifier.journalMONTHLY NOTICES OF THE ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETYen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.volume482
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage3609-3621
refterms.dateFOA2019-08-05T23:15:35Z


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